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Fall 2013 Graduate Course Descriptions

510:500    Historians Craft: 1 (Intro Course)
                  Professor Belinda Davis

Introduction to the professional study of history, to the diverse methodological approaches of current historiography, and to the place of historical scholarship in both academic and non-academic spheres.  First-year graduate students only.

 

510:536   Colloquium in the History of Medicine
                  Professor Johanna Schoen

This colloquium will introduce students to the study of the history of medicine by providing an introduction to historical research and writing.  We will cover select topics in the history of medicine, focused mostly on the 18th to 20th cent. with some comparison across  time and space.    In our weekly meetings, we will discuss not only the historiography, but ponder methodologies, research questions, approaches to the history of health and medicine that will serve as a broad introduction to the field.  Students will write short weekly papers and a 8-10 page literature review at the end of the semester.

Below find a selected list of topics and books:

Frameworks: selections of Foucault, Birth of the Clinic and Maulitz, Morbid Appearances

Colonial Medicine: Laura Thatcher Ulrich, A Midwife’s Tale

Practitioners and Patients: David Rothman, Strangers at the Bedside

Bodies and Gender: Ann Fausto Sterling, Sexing the Body or Joanne Meyerowitz, How Sex Changed

Public Health: Jeffrey Kluger, Splendid Solutions: Jonas Salk and the Conquest of Polio

Germ Theory and Public Health: Nancy Tomes, The Gospel of Germs

Occupational Health: Claudia Clark, Radium Girls

Medicine and Race: Keith Wailoo, Dying in the City of the Blues or Nyan Shah, Contagious Divides

Medical Experimentation: Susan Lederer, Subjected to Science

Technology: Monica Casper, The Making of the Unborn Patient or Keith Wailoo, Drawing Blood

Mental Illness: Jack Pressman, The Last Resort

Privacy Laws

Ethics


510:541   Colloquium in Global History
                  Professor Bonnie Smith

Prospective students who wish to discuss any aspects of the course should contact Professor Bonnie Smith at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .


510:549   Seminar in Women's and Gender History I
                  Professor Seth Koven

Prospective students who wish to discuss any aspects of the course should contact Professor Seth Koven at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .


510:551   Seminar in World Comparative: Atantic World
                  Professor Camilla Townsend

In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the world grew larger for everyone in the Atlantic World. For European sailors and the people who waited for them to return, for indigenous peoples of the Americas, for sub-Saharan Africans. The meeting of multiple worlds (colliding, reflecting, melting, forging, disintegrating—you choose the verb) has been a popular topic of late. There are extraordinary complexities-- both political and intellectual-- inherent in the necessary research. In this class, after a period of common readings, students will write primary research papers with a particular twist: everyone will be asked to give equal attention to more than one source base, preferably in more than one language. If the task seems daunting, it is perhaps worth reminding ourselves that we are trying to cross the same boundaries faced by our historical subjects.

 

510:555   Readings in American History I
                  Professor Peter Silver

Prospective students who wish to discuss any aspects of the course should contact Professor Peter Silver at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .


 510:560  Readings in Women's and Gender History
                  Professor Leah DeVun

Prospective students who wish to discuss any aspects of the course should contact Professor Leah DeVun at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

510:561  Colloquium in American History: History of Sexuality, Reproduction, and Family in the U.S.: The Colonial Period to the Present
                  Professor Rachel Devlin

Prospective students who wish to discuss any aspects of the course should contact Professor Rachel Devlin at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

510:563   Colloquium in African American History
                  Professor Mia Bay

This course is dedicated to exploring the interplay of social, historical, and spatial forces in configuring American racial formations, identities, and experiences. Although primarily focused on race, place and space as they figure in the African-American experience, the course readings also address American racial configurations as they affect other Americans: from Euro-Americans to Native Americans. Most of the readings will also figure gender as a central feature of racial stratification and racial thought.

 510:597   Readings in Early Modern European History
                  Professor Phyllis Mack

This is a readings course covering the very large field of early modern European history. The broad scope of this course, and of the field of Early Modern Europe in general, makes it impossible to cover more than a fraction of the movements, themes, and issues involved. This syllabus reflects my own interest in the themes of religion, gender, the body, and the history of individual and cultural identity. We will also discuss the equally  important themes of monarchy, Atlantic studies, revolutionary politics, and the Scientific Revolution. The course is designed as an introduction to these and other themes and their historiography, but in no way is it intended as a complete survey of the early modern period.

510:601    Colloquium in European History: The History of Human Rights
                  Professor Melissa Feinberg 

In the contemporary world, human rights are a rallying cry for a wide array of groups dedicated to ending all kinds of oppression. As historian Samuel Moyn has noted, the ideal of human rights has become "the last utopia," a new (and better) totalizing vision of a better world, to replace the problematic utopias of Marxism or nationalism. This course will critically examine the historical evolution of human rights. We will take a broad approach to the subject, considering both the intellectual history of human rights as a concept or ideology and the history of rights-based or rights-inspired activism.  While the course will include numerous examples from modern Europe, it will take a global view of the subject and a considerable number of readings will cover other parts of the world.


 510:616   Seminar in European History II
                   Professor Belinda Davis

Continuation of year long course; no new participants.

 





















 

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