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Graduate Student Contacts

Students are listed alphabetically by last name

 
 

Adams BeatriceBeatrice J. Adams
African-American History, American, Women's & Gender 
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Beatrice graduated with a B.A. in History from Fisk University in 2012 and with a M.A. in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago in 2013. She is interested in African American History and History of the American South. Specifically she is interested in how education, business ownership, and gender influenced individuals’ decisions to not participate in the Great Migration.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Armstead Shaun 2015Shaun Armstead
Women's and Gender, American History, Global and Comparative
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Shaun is a first year doctoral student who graduated with her B.A. in History from Auburn University in 2015. She is interested in examining the international women’s movement, particularly its interaction with supranational institutions such as the League of Nations and the United Nations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yarden Avital
Modern European History, Global and Comparative
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Catherine Babikian
Women's and Gender History,Modern European, STEH
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Catherine received her BA in history and BS in anthropology from the University of Iowa in 2015. Her research focuses on gender, race, and health care in twentieth-century Britain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eric Barry
U.S. 20th Century History, Early Modern European
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 Baker JesseJesse Bayker
Women's and Gender History, United States
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Jesse received a B.A. in History and LGBTQ Studies from CUNY Brooklyn College in 2010. He is a Ph.D. candidate and is currently writing his dissertation, "Before Transsexuality: Crossing the Borders of Gender in the United States, 1850-1960." His project examines transgender practices and narratives before the advent of sex reassignment surgeries. He is a recipient of the 2015 Schlesinger Library Dissertation Grant. For the 2015-2016 academic year, he holds a Graduate Assistant position at the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity. He is also a fellow in the Rutgers Pre-doctoral Leadership Development Institute and co-chair of the History Department’s Committee on Minority Student Affairs.

 

 

 

 

Bedward MoyaMoyagaye Bedward
Middle East, African History
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 Bennett Zach 2015Zachary Bennett
Early America, Atlantic World, African Diaspora
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Zachary’s research centers on the environmental history of early America. His dissertation examines the impact of rivers on the political and ecological transformation of the colonial northeast. Focusing on New England, the project reconceptualizes the English conquest of Native Americans as a quest not just to grab land, but a struggle to control access to rivers-the primary power sources and transportation arteries of the seventeenth and eighteenth century. Prior to Rutgers, Zachary received his B.A. from Northern Michigan University and his M.A. from Miami University.

 

 

 

 

 Black Sara 2015Sara Black
Modern European History
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Sara completed her B.A. in European studies and music from the College of William and Mary in 2009.  She is a sixth-year PhD student with a major field in modern European history and a minor field in global and comparative history.  Focusing on morphine, hashish, opium, ether, chloroform and cocaine, her dissertation explores the interwoven medical and cultural histories of psychotropic drugs in nineteenth-century France. By examining these substances in the context of criminal proceedings, psychological therapeutics, ideas and practices of sex and sexuality, surgical and obstetric anesthesia, and amateur and professional self-experimentation, her dissertation argues that psychotropic substances played a crucial role in the development of modern French subjectivities within a rapidly expanding pharmaceutical economy.

 

 

 

 

 altChristopher Blakley
Colonial, STEH, Early Modern European History
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Christopher received his MA in History from North Carolina State University, 2013, and his BA from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, 2011. His fields of study are early America, history of science, and environmental history. His research examines overlapping networks of early modern science, particularly environmental knowledge, and slavery in the Atlantic World. This research looks at intellectual exchanges and intersections between European and African ideas about nature and plantation environments. In 2015 he presented research on slavery and iron ore mining in colonial Virginia at Temple University. This project investigates how Virginia planters in the 1720s articulated their role in the British empire as masters of both American environments and enslaved Africans.

 

 

 

 

AJ Blandford
United States,STEH
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AJ received a BA in Architecture and Visual Arts from Barnard College. Her research is focused on the environmental and cultural histories of North American mining and the global metals trade in the 18th and early 19th century.

M. Dale Booth
Modern European History, Women's and Gender
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Dale received a B.A. in History and Anthropology and a M.A. in Comparative History from the College of William and Mary. Currently a fourth year doctoral student, Dale studies eighteenth and nineteenth-century British history, with a specific focus on gender, sexuality, and science. Dale’s dissertation addresses the intersection of natural history and gendered discourses along British coasts and waterways.

 

 Julia Bowes
United States, Women's and Gender History
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Julia is a fifth year doctoral candidate. Before moving to the United States to pursue graduate student, Julia completed a Bachelor of Arts (Hons I) at Sydney University, a Master’s in Public Policy at the Australian National University and worked in the women’s non-profit sector. She is interested in the intersections between the history of the family and the history the state, particularly in looking at the patriarchal family unit as a mode of governance and part of the apparatus of the state in the nineteenth and twentieth century U.S. Her dissertation “The Government of the Family: The Child, the Growth of the State and the Remaking of Patriarchal Authority 1850-1930” explores how the direct regulation of children by the state transformed the nature of state power and challenged existing familial governance arrangements, provoking a form of anti-statism rooted in a gendered defense of family sovereignty that produced the modern right to family privacy.

 

 

 

 altKendra Boyd
African-American History, United States
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Kendra holds a B.S. in Business Administration from Wayne State University and is currently a doctoral candidate in African American History. Her dissertation, "Freedom Enterprise: The Great Migration and Black Entrepreneurship in Detroit," aims to recast the history of the Great Migration by using entrepreneurship as a lens for examining black Southern migrants’ motivations, strategies, and experiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 altDanielle Bradley
Medieval European History,Global and Comparative
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Danielle has a B.A. from the University of Iowa, an M.A. from Reading University in medieval archaeology, and an MA from the University of Connecticut in medieval studies. Her research interests include chronicles and bureaucratic culture in later medieval England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

altMark Bray
Modern European History,Women’s and Gender
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Mark is a PhD Candidate studying Modern European History and Women's and Gender History, with a geographical focus on Spain. Supervised by Professor Temma Kaplan, his dissertation entitled "The Anarchist Inquisition:  Terrorism and the Ethics of Modernity of Spain, 1893-1909" looks at the impact of anarchist 'propaganda by the deed' on policies of state repression and an incipient international human rights movement at the turn of the century in Spain.  Prior to Rutgers, Mark completed his BA in Philosophy at Wesleyan University in 2005, and his MA in Modern European History and American History from Providence College in 2008.  For the 2012-13 academic year, he was a Fulbright Fellow in Spain, affiliated with the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. 

 

 

 

Brian Brown
Latin American History, American, Global and Comparative
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Brian is currently a second year doctoral student studying Latin American and U.S. history. Brian earned a B.A. in political science from Southwestern University in 2001, a M.Ed. in secondary education from Texas State University in 2011, and a M.A. in history from Texas State University in 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Buck
Modern European History, Women's and Gender, Latin American
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Julia received B.A.s in History with departmental honors and Spanish Language and Literature from Portland State University in 2013. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Modern European History. Her research centers around gender, migration, and clandestinity in interwar and World War II Europe. She is interested in the ways in which exile and refugee women re-established their social and political networks; interacted across cultures; and responded to displacement, trauma, and war.

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel Bunker
American History, STEH
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Rachel is a historian of political economy and the history of technology. Her dissertation examines the growth of the consumer information economy during the twentieth century in the United States and Latin America. Specifically, she traces the construction of networks and the circulation of consumer information exchange between corporations, in particular insurance companies and credit firms, and the state. Rachel is interested in how these material networks simultaneously shaped and were influenced by discourses on privacy, surveillance, equality, state authority, and corporate sovereignty in the latter decades of the twentieth century. During the 2015-2016 academic year, Rachel is serving as a graduate student fellow at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. Before coming to Rutgers, she received her MA in History from the University of Georgia and her MAT in Social Studies from Lewis and Clark College.

 

Hilary Buxton
Modern European History, Britain,Empire, Women’s and Gender
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Hilary received her B.A. in History from Smith College in 2011.  She is currently a fifth year doctoral student at Rutgers studying nineteenth and twentieth century body politics, gender, and medicine within the British Empire.  Her dissertation "Disabled Empire: Race, Rehabilitation, and the Politics of Healing Non-white Colonial Troops, 1914-1940" examines the bodily experience of Indian and West Indian servicemen in the Great War and its aftermath, to question how racial ideologies shaped the new healing industries and trauma care.

 

 

 

 

 

altMiya Carey
African-American History
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Miya is currently a fifth year in the history department.  She received her bachelor's degree in History and Pan-African Studies from Drew University.  Her research centers on African American and interracial organizations for girls.  Miya is interested in how notions of African American girlhood were shaped and contested in the twentieth century.

 

 

 

 

 

altSatyasikha (Shihka) Chakraborty
Women's and Gender History, Global and Comparative
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Shihka studied History at Jadavpur University in India before joining Rutgers in 2012. She is interested in histories of gender, race and labor in colonial households and her geographical focus is South Asia. She is currently working on ayahs - native female servants - who worked in Euro-Indian households from the eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries, with a particular focus on colonial visual culture.

 

 

 

 

 

altChristina Chiknas
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Christina earned a B.A. in History and Philosophy from Georgia State University in 2009. Currently, she researches the mass visualization of cosmopolitanism in early twentieth-century Europe, with a particular focus on consumer culture in Germany and France. Her dissertation project takes up the intersection between formal politics and cosmopolitan performances in a pan-European context, analyzing how masquerades influenced the turbulence of early twentieth-century politics.

 

 

 

 

 

altThomas Cossentino
United States, Political, African-American History
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Tom is a doctoral candidate from Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. After attending Delaware County Community College, he transferred to Villanova University, where he earned a B.A. (2009) and an M.A. (2011) in history. He studies twentieth century U.S. history, and his particular interests include social and political history and U.S. foreign relations. His dissertation investigates the different ways that military service in the Vietnam War shaped American veterans' ideas about their nation and its place in the world. 

 

 

 

 

 

 altJessica Lauren Criales
Early American History, Early Modern Europe
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Jessica is a PhD candidate in the areas of Colonial Latin American and Colonial US. Her interests include evangelization, religion, and indigenous practices of Christianity. Her dissertation analyzes the efforts of Christian indigenous peoples to create spaces that were both fully indigenous, in terms of ethnicity, and fully Christian, in terms of religion. In particular, her works centers on a convent for Zapotec and Mixtec women in Oaxaca, Mexico, and the "Brothertown Christian Indian Village," formed by coastal New England tribe members in upstate New York. She has a BA in History from the University of Notre Dame (2008) and a Master's in Spanish and Latin American Linguistic, Cultural, & Literary Studies from NYU (2012).

 

 

 

 

 Courtney Doucette
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Courtney received a B.A. in History and Russian Language from Lawrence University and an MA from the European University in St. Petersburg (Russia). Her current research focuses on the last years of Soviet history, when First Party Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev launched the most far reaching reform program in history. From 1985 to 1991 reformers emphasized socialism as the guiding ideology of reform, and Courtney's dissertation investigates how Soviet people engaged socialism in what we now know are the last years of Soviet history. Her research touches on the history of ideology, the press, morality and letter writing.

 

 

 

 

 

Mario D’Penha
Women’s and Gender History, South Asian
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 Kaisha Esty
African American History, Women's and Gender
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Kaisha earned her B.A. and MRes in American Studies from the University of Nottingham in the UK. She is currently a fourth year doctoral student at Rutgers where she studies African American and women’s and gender history. Fixated on competing notions of purity, Kaisha’s research explores the relationship between moral values and meanings of citizenship in the thought of African American women from Emancipation to the early 20th century.

 

 

 

 

 

 

altMaco Faniel
African-American History, Cultural, Urban, Carceral State
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Maco holds an M.A. in history from Texas Southern University and a B.A. in speech and communications from Texas A&M University. His master's thesis was recently published as a book, Hip-Hop in Houston: The Origin and Legacy (History Press, July 2013), in it he discovered the roots of Houston's hip-hop culture and brought to fore the persons and places that helped make Houston a significant hip-hop city.   He is interested in the social and cultural histories of African-Americans in the late twentieth century, with particular focus on the ways in which those considered invisible, deviant, worthless, or marginal made meaning of American life. More specifically, he will be investigating the political economy and lived experiences of the War on Drugs in Houston, TX.

 

 

 

 

Hannah Frydman
Modern European History, France, Women's and Gender
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Hannah received her B.A. in History and French Studies from Smith College in 2012.  Currently a second year doctoral student at Rutgers, she studies modern European women's and gender history, and works on women’s sexuality, communication(s), illegitimate commerce, and the law in late 19th- and early 20th-century France.

 

 

 

 

 

Marlene Gaynair
African Diaspora, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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Marlene received her B.A., Specialized Honours and M.A. in History at York University in Toronto. Her interests lies in the Black Atlantic/African Diaspora, contextualized through discussions of migration, race, gender, identity, and citizenship within diasporic communities in urban centres.

 

 

 

 

 

 

altEarl (Judge) Glock
American History
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Judge graduated from the College of William and Mary with a B.A. in History in 2004, and returned to William and Mary to receive an M.A. in American History in 2008, where he completed a thesis on the electric street in Richmond, Virginia.  He also spent a year teaching English in Suzhou, China, and spent two years doing historical research on Native American and environmental lawsuits for a contractor with the Department of Justice.   He started his PhD studies at Rutgers in 2010, and is focusing his research on urban history in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.

 

 

 

 
 

altBrittany Hall
African-American History, Diaspora
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Brittany received her B.A. in English and American Literature from New York University where she also completed graduate work at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. With interests across disciplines, Brittany’s primary area of interest is African American cultural history. She is particularly interested in the visual culture of late nineteenth and early twentieth century America, with an emphasis on black body politics and the development of a conscious black identity in an increasingly global imperial moment.

 

 

 

 

Catherine Harris
Early Modern History,British Isles, Global and Comparative
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Catherine graduated with a B.A. in History, Plan II, and European Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. She is currently a second-year doctoral student whose research focuses on the British Isles in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth-century, with an emphasis on state formation, immigration, citizenship and identity, and religious toleration situated in European and imperial contexts.

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick Harris
Modern European History, Comparative, American
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Patrick is currently a second-year doctoral student studying modern European history, with an emphasis on intellectual and cultural history of the 18th and 19th centuries. His research focuses on the relationship between political thought and empire in Britain and France, and has investigated slavery and abolition, counterrevolutionary thought, and concepts of culture. He received a B.A. in History-International Studies and Philosophy at Rhodes College in 2009.

 

 

 

 

 

 Kate Imy
Modern European History, Global and Comparative
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Kate is a PhD candidate studying with Seth Koven, Bonnie Smith and Indrani Chatterjee in the fields of European and Global and Comparative History. In the summer of 2012 and 2013, Kate completed intensive Hindi an Urdu language training in India, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Critical Language Scholarship Program.  She is the recipient of a Fulbright Full Research Grant to India and Mellon Fellowship to study for a year in the United Kingdom under the guidance of the Institute of Historical Research. Her dissertation, entitled "Spiritual Soldiers: Masculinity and the Body in the British Indian Army, 1900-1940" analyzes the British Indian Army as a site of exchange and encounter where international cultures of body developed during a period of unparalleled warfare, colonial violence, and anti-colonial activism.  It reorients nationalist narratives of military history by focusing on the interaction between British and South Asian soldiers and using sources in English, Hindi, and Urdu. By focusing on bodily practices her dissertation explores how the physicality of soldiers' everyday lives not only undermined the distinctions between "spiritual" and "secular," but also provides insight into how and why soldiers fought and died for "God" and "country.

 

 Travis Jeffres
Early American History, Native American
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Travis specializes in the history of the indigenous peoples of North America (including Mexico), sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. My dissertation, "The Costs of Conquest: Dislocation, Diaspora, and Indigenous Identities in Northern New Spain, 1530-1640," mines indigenous experience during New Spain's thrust into what is now northern Mexico and the U.S. Southwest. Indigenous peoples from Central and Western Mexico participated in prodigious numbers in this process of settlement and conquest. The dissertation draws on indigenous-authored sources in Spanish as well as Nahuatl (the language of the Aztecs) in order to recover the experiences and identities of these indigenous peoples in diaspora.

Tracey Johnson
African American History
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altJulia Katz
United States, Global and Comparative History
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Julia received her B.A. in Africana Studies from New York University in 2011.  She is a fifth year doctoral student at Rutgers studying U.S. and Hawaiian history.  Her research examines Asian migration to Hawaii, focusing on intimacies between migrant Asians and indigenous Polynesians, and Asian accommodations to American empire.

 

 

 

 

 

altWilliam Kelly

Latin American History, United States
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William is a third-year student in the department with a focus on Latin American and Caribbean history. His dissertation will explore housing policy, community, and everyday life in Cuba in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s. William holds a master's degree in history from the University of Chicago and a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of South Florida.

 

 

 

 

 

Alissa Klots
Modern European History, USSR, Women's and Gender
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Alissa Klots is a PhD candidate currently working on her dissertation entitled "The Kitchen Maid That Will Rule the State: Domestic Service and the Soviet Revolutionary Project, 1917-1953." Her research has been supported by awards form the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the German Historical Institute in Moscow and the Open Society Foundation.

 

 

 

 

 

Yvette Florio Lane
Modern European History, Women's and Gender
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Yvette is a PhD candidate whose research interests are at the intersection of histories of consumerism and advertising, technology, and material culture. Yvette holds a BA in Anthropology from the State University of New York College at New Paltz, and an MA in History from Monmouth University. Yvette has written on the use of rayon in comparative perspective, women immigrants and national identity, and is currently working on her dissertation, “Duty and Desire: Selling Benevolence in Modern Britain,” which focuses on how modern British identity was shaped, in part, through acts of philanthropic consumerism. Linking together these research interests are questions of in/authenticity, modernity, and the methodology of reading objects as texts through which aspects of lived experience are illuminated.

Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders
Modern American History, African-American
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Katharine Lee
Early American History, Women’s and Gender
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Katharine received her B.A. in American Social Development from Grinnell College, and an M.A. in History from the University of Tulsa. Her research focuses on questioning and redefining our understanding of American politics and political activism from 1760-1840 in order to reveal the ways in which women participated in community and national politics. In addition, her dissertation challenges prevailing concepts within her field such as separate spheres and women's economic ignorance in hope of better understanding women's experiences in the late colonial and early national eras. Through these explorations, Katharine seeks to reveal a more nuanced understanding of Early American political expression and the roles and responsibilities of women in this period.

 

Rong (Aries) Li
American History, Modern Asian History
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Rong (Aries) received her B.A. and M.A. in History form Northeast Normal University in China. She is interested in U.S. Foreign Relations. Her research focuses on the twentieth century U.S.-East Asian relations, with a special interest in war memories, perceptions, and propaganda.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rebecca Lubot
Twentieth Century US history, US in the World
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Rebecca earned a joint MSc in international history and international relations from The London School of Economics and Political Science, and a BA in political science from Boston University. Her PhD dissertation, entitled "Crisis of Succession:  Discourse and Anxiety Surrounding the Twenty-Fifth Amendment" is a political and cultural history of the sudden transition of executive power during a crisis.

 

 

 

 

 

 altRaechel Lutz
United States, STEH
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Raechel earned her B.A. in History and Art History from Ithaca College in 2007. While working at the Montclair Art Museum in Montclair, NJ, she earned her M.A. in History from Rutgers University - Newark in 2010. Raechel is currently working on her Ph.D. dissertation at Rutgers University – New Brunswick with advisors Ann Fabian and Neil Maher, and committee member Toby C. Jones. Her dissertation asks fundamental questions about the relationship between oil, environment, and toxicity by investigating the history of the Standard Oil refineries in Northeast New Jersey. 

 

 

 

 

 

 Tara Malanga
Latin American History, Global and Comparative
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Kathleen Manning
Early Modern European History, Women's and Gender
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Daniel Manuel
American, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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Daniel received a B.A. (2012) and an M.A. (2014) in history from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is a first-year doctoral student in American history and women’s and gender history. His interests include social movements and the politics of gender and sexuality in the 20th-century US South.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Hugo Marquez Soljancic
Medieval History, Women's and Gender
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Hugo earned his B.A. and M.A. at Wichita State University, concentrating on Western Europe in the Middle Ages. He is currently focusing on the intersections between sexual and gender constructions, natural philosophy, and heresy during the High Middle Ages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lytton McDonnell
United States, Cultural History
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Lytton is a PhD candidate interested in the historical intersections of music, emotion, and altered states of consciousness in the United States and the "trance"-Atlantic world. Originally from Canada, he has earned history degrees from the University of Ottawa (BA, 2004) and the University of Victoria (MA, 2009) as well as a diploma in music composition from Selkirk College (2006). His dissertation explores various manifestations of musical trance during the late-19th and early-20th centuries, including the melodious ecstasies of Pentecostal revivalists, the sublime raptures of opera-goers, and consumer “play” — that experience of getting caught up or lost in cultural products and practices, which lies at the heart of modern entertainment.

 

 

 

 

Steven McGrail
American History, Women’s and Gender
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Patrick McGrath
American History, Cultural and Intellectual
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Paul Mercandetti
Modern European History
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Laura Michel
Colonial American, Comparative, Early Modern European History
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Laura received her B.A. in history from Carleton College and her M.A. in Eighteenth-Century Worlds from the University of Liverpool. Her research interests include the history of poverty and crime in the eighteenth-century Atlantic World.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Damien Miller
American History, Women’s and Gender
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Taylor Moore
Middle Eastern History, Women's and Gender
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Taylor Moore received her BA in Honors Political Science and Sociology from The American University in Cairo in 2013. She is currently a third year PhD student specializing in Modern Middle East History. Her work focuses on the intersections of race, political economy, ethno-botany/folk medicine, and the development of natural and social sciences in nineteenth-century Upper Egypt.

 

 

 

 

 

Katherine Morris
Women's and Gender History, American, Diaspora
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Katy graduated from Smith College in 2011, majoring in the Study of Women and Gender with a concentration in race and culture. She then received her MA in oral history at Columbia University in 2013. Her research focuses on the history of gender and sexuality in the 20th century US, with a special interest in rural lesbian history in the American West.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenneth Moss
Latin American History, Women’s and Gender
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Anna Nath
Modern European History
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altDustin Neighly
Medieval History, Global and Comparative
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Dustin received his B.A. from the University of Washington.  Currently in his third year of the Rutgers PhD program, Dustin's research focuses on the intersections of power, resistance, and integration within the manorial system of medieval England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 altMatthew O’Brien
Early Modern European History, Modern Europe
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 Alexander Petrusek
Modern European History, Global and Compartiver
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Jennifer Pettit
American History, Gender
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Svanur Petursson
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Marika Plater
American History, STEH
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Marika is a third year doctoral student at Rutgers after receiving a B.A. from Bard College in 2008 and an M.A. from Brooklyn College in 2013. Marika is interested in U.S. environmental history, particularly in diverse and divergent ideas about nature in late nineteenth and early twentieth-century New York City.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kristin Canzano Pinyan
Medieval European History, Women’s and Gender
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Kristin earned her B.A. in Medieval Studies and English from Georgetown University in 2004 and her M.A. in Medieval Studies from Fordham University in 2005. She taught US history at a New Jersey high school before coming to Rutgers in 2007 to pursue a PhD in medieval European history. Her dissertation tentatively titled "Gentility and Status in Late Medieval England." Kristin also teaches Expository Writing and is a fellow at the Pre-Doctoral Leadership Development Institute.

Jazmin Puicon
Latin American History, Women’s and Gender
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Jazmin received her BA from Union College (NY) and her MA from NYU in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.  She is a fifth year PhD student in Latin American History and Women's and Gender History working under the supervision of Professors Temma Kaplan, Aldo Lauria Santiago, and Mark Wasserman.  Focusing on barrio life in Cali after La Violencia in Colombia, her dissertation examines the participation of working-class men and women as they reclaimed their political rights and redefined cultural and gender norms through salsa music and oral history in Colombia.

 

altDavid Reid
American History, modern Mexico
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David earned a BA in Spanish and History from Dalhousie University in Halifax and an MA in History from York University in Toronto. His dissertation examines Mexican water politics in the Cold War, focusing on a dispute between Mexico and the United States over salt contamination in the Colorado River in the 1960s and early 70s. It explores environment, infrastructure, and economic development in statecraft and the links between local, national, and international politics.

 

 

 

 

 

Benjamin Resnick-Day
Early American History, Atlantic
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altMelissa Reynolds
Early Modern European History, Medieval, Women's and Gender
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Melissa received her B.A. in English with Honors from the University of Alabama in 2005 and, after a few years toiling in an office, received her M.A. in History from the same institution in 2011.  She is interested in the expansion of literacy and visual practice in 15th- and 16th-century England, with a particular emphasis on images and readng practices among the semi-literate, includng women and children.  Her current work explores iconography and astrology in both manscript and print almanacs and prognostications.

 

 

 

 

Charles Riggs
American History
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Charlie is a fourth-year PhD student in American cultural and intellectual history, with interests in therapeutic culture, political economy, attitudes toward work, and the history of capitalism writ large. His current research examines the connection between white collar job-seeking, career development, and notions of selfhood in the twentieth-century United States. He earned his Bachelor's in History from Harvard College in 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

Paul Sampson
Early American History, STEH
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Paul is a first-year doctoral student studying intellectual history in the British Atlantic World, particularly how new scientific developments influenced long-held assumptions in politics and religion. He received his B.A. in History from the University of Dallas in Irving, Texas in 2011 and his M.A. in Early Modern European and Early American History from Marquette University in 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nelson Santana
Latin American, Comparative, American History
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Nelson obtained his B.A. in English from Baruch College (CUNY), his M.A. in the Study of the Americas from the City College of New York (CUNY), and his M.S. in Library and Information Science from Drexel University. His research centers on the cultural, and social history of Dominican migration in the United States. He is particularly interested in the types of social networks established by Dominican migrants in the sixties and seventies and their impact on the fabric of U.S. history.

 

 

 

 

 

altPeter Sorensen
Latin American History, Comparative
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Peter earned his B.A. in History and Classical Studies from York University in Toronto and his M.A. in History from Trent University in Peterborough, Canada.  His research focuses on Pre-Columbian and Early Colonial Mexico with a focus on the Valley of Mexico.  Peter works with Nahuatl documents including the Cantares Mexicanos and The Florentine Codex to understand Pre-Columbian Social and Cultural History as well as their production as Colonial Documents.

 

 

 

 

 

altDustin Stalnaker
Modern European History, Comparative, Women's and Gender
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Dustin earned his BA in History from the University of Chicago in 2008 and his MA in History from the University of Missouri- Kansas City in 2013. His primary interests include working-class politics in Weimar and prewar Nazi Germany, international participation in the Spanish Civil War, and the historiography of antifascism since 1989.

 

 

 

 

 

altMatthew Carlos Stehney
American History, African-American
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Matthew received his BA in history and American culture from the University of Michigan.  He studies 20th Century U.S. social, cultural, and political history in the areas of race and ethnicity, social movements, and conversatism.  Matthew's current work explores Black Capitalism, the economic development of "the ghetto," and conservative political discourse since the 1950s. 

 

 

 

 

 

Brenann Sutter
American, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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Bren earned her BA in history and sociology from the University of California, San Diego in 2010. In 2012, she completed her MA in history at New York University. Bren is currently pursuing her PhD in twentieth-century American history with a concentration in women and gender. Her research explores tensions between economic citizenship, consumption, and social power. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rachael Swierzewski
American History
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 altLauren Swift
Early Modern History, Women's and Gender, Comparative
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Lauren,a third-year PhD student, graduated from Earlham College in 2011 with a B.A. in History.  Lauren's interests include Early Modern northern Europe and Scandinavia, gender, and the construction of self and bodies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan Driskell Tate
American History,Women's and Gender, labor, social
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Ryan is a third-year PhD student studying the twentieth century United States. His interests lie broadly in energy and the environment; social politics and social protest; labor and work; and women’s and gender history. His current project examines grassroots resistance movements to expanding energy infrastructures, and how, between the 1960s and 1980s, these social activists connected their movements to broader cultural criticisms about the role of technology in American life. He received his B.A. in Honors History from Hamline University.

 

 

 

 

 

Lance Thurner
Latin American History, American
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altDara Walker
African American History
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Dara received her B.A. in African American Studies from Eastern Michigan University in 2009 and a M.A. in Pan-African Studies from Syracuse University in 2011.  She is currently a fourth year doctoral student in African American History where her research explores urban history, women’s history, and 20th century U.S. social history. She is principally interested in the ways in which postwar high school student activism in Detroit shaped and was shaped by city politics, the black labor movement and calls for community control of educational institutions.

 

 

 

 

 Pamela Walker
African American History, Women's and Gender
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Pamela graduated with a B.A. in History and a Minor in Journalism and Electronic Media from The University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 2011.  She received her M.A. in History from the University of New Orleans in 2015. She is interested in African American History, History of the American South, and Women’s and Gender History. Pamela is specifically interested in the intersections of race, class, gender, and intergenerational constraints surrounding women’s participation in the modern civil rights movement.

 

 

 

 

Meagan Wierda
19th C. US History, STEH
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Caitlin Wiesner
Women's and Gender History, African American
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Caitlin is a first year doctoral student specializing in Women's History in the twentieth century United States. She received her BA in History and Women's & Gender Studies from The College of New Jersey in 2015. Her research interests include theoretical interventions in the history of sexual violence, specifically how race and class influenced the construction of anti-rape organizations and coalitions in the 1970s.

 

 

Danielle Willard-Kyle
Modern European, Jewish, Women's and Gender History
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Danielle received her B.A. in History and English from Westmont College, her M.A. in History in collaboration with Jewish Studies from the University of Toronto, and her M.St. in Jewish Studies from the University of Oxford. She is currently a second-year doctoral student working on Modern European and Women's and Gender Studies. In particular, her research focuses on post-Holocaust refugees, migration, and families in Western Europe.

 

 

 

 

 

 Kyle Williams
American History
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Kyle received his Bachelor's from the University of Oklahoma in 2011, where he studied history and classical languages. His current interests lie in the 19th- and early 20th-century United States, broadly in intellectual and cultural history, Populism, and the history of capitalism.

 

altJennifer Wilson
Early Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Jennifer is a PhD Candidate studying early modern English religious politics and bodily epistemologies. Working under the supervision of Alastair Bellany, her dissertation entitled “Reading Ambiguous Bodies: Confessional Politics and Epistemological Anxiety in Early Modern England, c.1580-1660,” examines the ways that knowledge about the body shaped early modern confessional contests. She earned an M.A. from The New School for Social Research and is the recipient of the Bevier fellowship for 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

Sara Wisdom
Early Modern European History
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Jasmin Young
African-American History, American
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 Kevin Young
Latin American, Caribbean History, Global and Comparative
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Kevin is a third-year PhD candidate who completed qualifying examinations in Colonial and Modern Latin America and Global Comparative History in 2015. His dissertation concerns the enslavement of Native Americans from New Spain in Caribbean colonies from the Bourbon Reforms throughout the long nineteenth century. His committee includes Aldo Lauria-Santiago, Mark Wasserman, and Camilla Townsend.

 

 

 

 

 

alt

Amy Zanoni
American History, Women's and Gender, African-American
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Amy is interested in the history of social movements in the twentieth-century U.S. Her research examines anti-poverty, labor, and feminist organizing in response to the political economic transformations of the 1970s and 1980s. Amy received a BA in Latin American & Caribbean Studies and Cultural Studies from McGill University in 2008, and an MA in Historical Studies from the University of Maryland Baltimore County in 2013.

 

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