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Graduate Student Contacts

 

 

 

 

 



Graduate Student Contacts

Students are listed alphabetically by last name

Gretchen Abbott
Women’s & Gender History,Modern U.S.
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Beatrice J. Adams
African-American History, American, Women's & Gender 
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Beatrice graduated with a B.A. in History from Fisk University in 2012 and with a M.A. in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago in 2013. She is interested in African American History and History of the American South. Specifically she is interested in how education, business ownership, and gender influenced individuals’ decisions to not participate in the Great Migration.

 

 

 

 

 

Jahaira Arias
Latin American History, Global and Comparative
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Jahaira Arias received her BA at Trinity College, Hartford in 2004. She is currently conducting her dissertation research on nineteenth century politics in the Dominican Republic. In particular, she is interested in how popular conceptions of race, nation and freedom informed political behavior in this period.

Yarden Avital
Modern European History, Global and Comparative
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Eric Barry
U.S. 20th Century History, Early Modern European
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 altJesse Bayker
Women's and Gender History
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Jesse Bayker received his B.A. in History from CUNY Brooklyn College in 2010.  He is currently a fifth year doctoral student in Women’s and Gender History, focusing on U.S. urban and social history and the history of sexuality.  In particular, he is interested in the boundaries of gender and the ways ordinary people constructed, policed, and traveled across those boundaries in the 19th century.

 

 

 

 

 

altMoyagaye Bedward
Middle East, African History
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 altZachary Bennett
Colonial, African-American History, Comparative
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Zachary received his B.A. from Northern Michigan University and his M.A. from Miami University of Ohio.  His interests center on environmental and economic history in colonial North America and the early United States.  Current research projects analyze rivers as contested geographical spaces where cultures articulate competing notions of political economy and property rights.

 

 

 

 

 

altSara Black
Modern European History
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Sara completed her B.A. in European studies and music from the College of William and Mary in 2009.  She is a fifth year PhD student with a major field in modern European history and a minor field in global and comparative history.  Focusing on morphine, hashish, opium, ether, chloroform and cocaine, her dissertation explores the interwoven medical and cultural histories of mind-altering drugs in nineteenth-century France. By examining these substances in the context of criminal proceedings, psychological therapeutics, ideas and practices of sex and sexuality, surgical and obstetric anesthesia, and amateur and professional self-experimentation, her dissertation argues that psychotropic substances played a crucial role in the development of modern French subjectivities within a rapidly expanding pharmaceutical economy.

 

 

 

 

altChristopher Blakley
Colonial, STEH, Early Modern European History
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Christopher received his M.A. in History from North Carolina State University in 2013 and his B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington in 2011. He is currently a secondyear doctoral student in the history of science, technology, environment, and health, and early America. His research interests revolve around the co-production of scientific knowledge and imperial power in North America and the Atlantic World in the early modern period. He is currently working on a project for the Networks of Exchange seminar on the appropriation of Iroquoian knowledge by investigating John Bartram’s 1743 expedition to Onondaga.

 

 

 

 

AJ Blandford
United States,STEH
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M. Dale Booth
Modern European History, Women's and Gender
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Julia Bowes
United States, Women's and Gender History
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altKendra Boyd
African-American History
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Kendra holds a B.S. in Business Administration from Wayne State University and is currently a fifth year doctoral student in African American History.  Her research explores black entrepreneurship in Detroit, Michigan during the Great Migration. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

altDanielle Bradley
Medieval European History,Global and Comparative
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Danielle has a B.A. from the University of Iowa, an M.A. from Reading University in medieval archaeology, and an MA from the University of Connecticut in medieval studies. Her research interests include chronicles and bureaucratic culture in later medieval England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

altMark Bray
Modern European History,Women’s and Gender
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Mark is a PhD Candidate studying Modern European History and Women's and Gender History, with a geographical focus on Spain. Supervised by Professor Temma Kaplan, his dissertation entitled "The Anarchist Inquisition:  Terrorism and the Ethics of Modernity of Spain, 1893-1909" looks at the impact of anarchist 'propaganda by the deed' on policies of state repression and an incipient international human rights movement at the turn of the century in Spain.  Prior to Rutgers, Mark completed his BA in Philosophy at Wesleyan University in 2005, and his MA in Modern European History and American History from Providence College in 2008.  For the 2012-13 academic year, he was a Fulbright Fellow in Spain, affiliated with the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. 

 

 

 

Brian Brown
Latin American History, American, Global and Comparative
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Brian is currently a first year doctoral student studying Latin American and U.S. history. Brian earned a B.A. in political science from Southwestern University in 2001, a M.Ed. in secondary education from Texas State University in 2011, and a M.A. in history from Texas State University in 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Buck
Modern European History, Women's and Gender, Latin American
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Julia received B.A.s in History with departmental honors and Spanish Language and Literature from Portland State University in 2013. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Modern European History. Her research centers around gender, migration, and clandestinity in interwar and World War II Europe. She is interested in the ways in which exile and refugee women re-established their social and political networks; interacted across cultures; and responded to displacement, trauma, and war.

 

 

 

 

 

Rachel Bunker
Women's and Gender History, American, STEH
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Hilary Buxton
Modern European History, Britain,Empire, Women’s and Gender
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Hilary received her B.A. in History from Smith College in 2011.  She is currently a fourth year doctoral student at Rutgers studying nineteenth and twentieth century body politics, gender, and medicine within the British Empire.  Her dissertation project explores race, rehabilitation, and the politics of healing non-white Commonwealth troops in the Great War and its aftermath.

altMiya Carey
African-American History
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Miya is currently a fourth year in the history department.  She received her bachelor's degree in History and Pan-African Studies from Drew University ("11).  Her research centers on African American and interracial organizations for girls.  Miya is interested in how notions of African American girlhood were shaped and contested in the twentieth century.

 

 

 

 

 

altSatyasikha Chakraborty
Women's and Gender History, Global and Comparative
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Satyasikha studied History at Jadavpur University in India before joining Rutgers in 2012. She is interested in histories of gender, race and labor in colonial households and her geographical focus is South Asia. She is currently working on ayahs - native female servants - who worked in Euro-Indian households from the eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries, with a particular focus on colonial visual culture.

 

 

 

 

 

altChristina Chiknas
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Christina earned a B.A. in History and Philosophy from Georgia State University in 2009. Currently, she researches the mass visualization of cosmopolitanism in early twentieth-century Europe, with a particular focus on consumer culture in Germany and France. Her dissertation project takes up the intersection between formal politics and cosmopolitan performances in a pan-European context, analyzing how masquerades influenced the turbulence of early twentieth-century politics.

 

 

 

 

 

altThomas Cossentino
United States, Political, African-American History
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Thomas is a fourth year doctoral student from Upper Darby, Pennsylvania.  After attending Delware County Community College, he transferred to Villanova University, where he earned a B.A. (2009) and an M.A. (2011) in history.  He studies twentieth century U.S. history, and his particular interests include the politics of race, U.S. foreign relations, and the ways in which military service shaped the political identities of American Vietnam-era veterans. 

 

 

 

 

 

 altJessica Lauren Criales
Early American History, Early Modern Europe
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Jessica is a third-year PhD student studying Colonial Latin American and Colonial US.  Her interests include evangelization, religion, and indigenous practices of Christianity, particularly by women.  Her current research focuses on convents for Zapotec and Mixtec women in Oaxaca, Mexico, as well as the Brothertown Pequot/Mohegan community in upstate New York.  She has a BA in History from the University of Notre Dame and a Master's in Spanish and Latin American Linguistic, Cultural, & Literary Studies from NYU.

 

 

 

 

Robert Daiutolo
Early American History, Early Modern Europe
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altRaymond Dansereau
Medieval European History, Early Modern Europe
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Raymond is currently teaching at Newark as lecturer in History under the Newark Teacher-Scholar Fellowship.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtney Doucette
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Courtney received a B.A. in History and Russian Language from Lawrence University and an MA from the European University in St. Petersburg (Russia). Her current research focuses on the last years of Soviet history, when First Party Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev launched the most far reaching reform program in history. From 1985 to 1991 reformers emphasized socialism as the guiding ideology of reform, and Courtney's dissertation investigates how Soviet people engaged socialism in what we now know are the last years of Soviet history. Her research touches on the history of ideology, the press, morality and letter writing.

 

 

 

 

 

Mario D’Penha
Women’s and Gender History, South Asian
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Mark Duggan
Early Modern History, Modern Europe
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 altElisabeth Eittreim
Women’s and Gender History, Modern U.S.
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Elisabeth is working on her dissertation, " The Teachers' Dilemma: Gender, Empire, and Education, 1879-1918," which examines how teachers, who worked at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School and in the Philippines around the turn of the twentieth century, struggled in negotiating their roles as educators to fulfill U.S. government mandates and students' needs, as well as their own personal and political desires.  Prior to her tenure at Rutgers, Elisabeth earned a Masters in Human Rights from Columbia University, a Masters in Teaching Quinnipiac University, and a B.A. in History from the University of Virginia.  She taught middle school in Connecticut, Washington, DC and NJ, and worked on campaigns regarding education and human rights.

 

 

 

 

altKaisha Esty
African American History, Women's and Gender
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Kaisha Esty is a third year doctoral student in the History Department at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. She earned a B.A. and M.A. in American Studies at the University of Nottingham in the UK. Her research interests include 19th and 20th century African American cultural and intellectual history, women's and gender history, and the US South.

 

 

 

 

 

altMaco Faniel
African-American History, Cultural, Carceral State
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Maco holds an M.A. in history from Texas Southern University and a B.A. in speech and communications from Texas A&M University. His master's thesis was recently published as a book, Hip-Hop in Houston: The Origin and Legacy (History Press, July 2013), in it he discovered the roots of Houston's hip-hop culture and brought to fore the persons and places that helped make Houston a significant hip-hop city.   He is interested in the social and cultural histories of African-Americans in the late twentieth century, with particular focus on the ways in which those considered invisible, deviant, worthless, or marginal made meaning of American life.

 

 

 

 

Hannah Frydman
Modern European History, France, Women's and Gender
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Hannah received her B.A. in History and French Studies from Smith College in 2012.  Currently a second year doctoral student at Rutgers, she studies modern European women's and gender history, and works on women’s sexuality, communication(s), illegitimate commerce, and the law in late 19th- and early 20th-century France.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marlene Gaynair
African Diaspora, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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Marlene received her B.A., Specialized Honours and M.A. in History at York University in Toronto, Canada. She generally considers herself an Atlantic Creole, based upon the scholarly work of Jane Landers. She is interested in the Black Atlantic World, specifically diasporic communities, and the formation and re/contextualization of identity and citizenship. With a particular focus on ideas of gender and race and the settlement and development of the Jamaican immigrant communities in Canada and the United States, she will attempt to build upon the scholarly framework of postcolonialism and conceptualization of diasporic identities over time.

 

 

 

 

Molly Giblin
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender, Global and Comparative
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Molly is completing a dissertation on nineteenth-century French interactions with China, which situates the semi-colonial relationship within a framework of global networks, personal bonds, and affective politics. 

 Nigel Gillah
Medieval European History, Early Modern Europe
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altEarl (Judge) Glock
American History
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Judge graduated from the College of William and Mary with a B.A. in History in 2004, and returned to William and Mary to receive an M.A. in American History in 2008, where he completed a thesis on the electric street in Richmond, Virginia.  He also spent a year teaching English in Suzhou, China, and spent two years doing historical research on Native American and environmental lawsuits for a contractor with the Department of Justice.   He started his PhD studies at Rutgers in 2010, and is focusing his research on urban history in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.

 

 

 

 
 

altBrittany Hall
African-American History, Diaspora
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Brittany received her B.A. in English and American Literature from New York University where she also completed graduate work at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. With interests across disciplines, Brittany’s primary area of interest is African American cultural history. She is particularly interested in the visual culture of late nineteenth and early twentieth century America, with an emphasis on black body politics and the development of a conscious black identity in an increasingly global imperial moment.

 

 

 

 

 

Catherine Harris
Early Modern History, Modern European
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Patrick Harris
Modern European History, Comparative, American
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Jessica Herzog
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Jessica earned her B.A. in History and Women's Studies from the Pennsylvania State University and her M.A. in Russian and East European Studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is a third year doctoral student at Rutgers, studying modern European history and women's and gender history. Her research focuses on travel and leisure in Eastern Europe during the cold war era. Currently, she is examining the development of Hungary's tourism industry in the 1960s and 1970s.

 

altMelissa Horne
Modern US, African American History
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Melissa is a doctoral candidate whose research interests include the late-19th and 20th century American South and African American social, cultural, and intellectual history.  Her dissertation focuses on the history of black higher education and student activism during the interwar years.  She received her B.A. and M.A. from Carleton University in Ottawa. 

 

 

 

 



altKate Imy
Modern European History, Global and Comparative
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Kate is a PhD candidate studying with Seth Koven, Bonnie Smith and Indrani Chatterjee in the fields of European and Global and Comparative History. In the summer of 2012 and 2013, Kate completed intensive Hindi an Urdu language training in India, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Critical Language Scholarship Program.  She is the recipient of a Fulbright Full Research Grant to India and Mellon Fellowship to study for a year in the United Kingdom under the guidance of the Institute of Historical Research. Her dissertation, entitled "Spiritual Soldiers: Masculinity and the Body in the British Indian Army, 1900-1940" analyzes the British Indian Army as a site of exchange and encounter where international cultures of body developed during a period of unparalleled warfare, colonial violence, and anti-colonial activism.  It reorients nationalist narratives of military history by focusing on the interaction between British and South Asian soldiers and using sources in English, Hindi, and Urdu. By focusing on bodily practices her dissertation explores how the physicality of soldiers' everyday lives not only undermined the distinctions between "spiritual" and "secular," but also provides insight into how and why soldiers fought and died for "God" and "country.

Travis Jeffres
Early American History, Native American
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Travis an early Americanist specializing in Native American history. Broadly, I am interested in Euro-American empires and indigenous peoples in 17th, 18th, and 19th century North America. Currently I am looking at how Euro-Americans constructed (or conjured) empires in the mid-continent, and how Native Americans countered, negotiated, and brokered those efforts.

altJulia Katz
United States, Global and Comparative History
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Julia received her B.A. in Africana Studies from New York University in 2011.  She is a fourth year doctoral student at Rutgers studying U.S. and Hawaiian history.  Her research examines Asian migration to Hawaii, focusing on intimacies between migrant Asians and indigenous Polynesians, and Asian accommodations to American empire.

 

 

 

 

 

altWilliam Kelly

Latin American History, United States
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William's most recent work explores criminality and policing in late 19th and early 20th century Cuba, with particular emphasis on the ways in which both elite actors and ordinary Cubans were implicated in the construction of ground-level conceptions of deviance. William holds a master's degree in history from the University of Chicago, as well as a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of South Florida. Prior to attending the University of Chicago, William spent four years teaching Spanish in public charter schools in Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

Alissa Klots
Modern European History, USSR, Women's and Gender
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Yvette Florio Lane
Modern European History, Women's and Gender
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Yvette is a PhD candidate whose research interests are at the intersection of histories of consumerism and advertising, technology, and material culture. Yvette holds a BA in Anthropology from the State University of New York College at New Paltz, and an MA in History from Monmouth University. Yvette has written on the use of rayon in comparative perspective, women immigrants and national identity, and is currently working on her dissertation, “Duty and Desire: Selling Benevolence in Modern Britain,” which focuses on how modern British identity was shaped, in part, through acts of philanthropic consumerism. Linking together these research interests are questions of in/authenticity, modernity, and the methodology of reading objects as texts through which aspects of lived experience are illuminated.

Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders
Modern American History, African-American
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Katharine Lee
Early American History, Women’s and Gender
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Katharine received her B.A. in American Social Development from Grinnell College, and an M.A. in History from the University of Tulsa. Her research focuses on questioning and redefining our understanding of American politics and political activism from 1760-1840 in order to reveal the ways in which women participated in community and national politics. In addition, her dissertation challenges prevailing concepts within her field such as separate spheres and women's economic ignorance in hope of better understanding women's experiences in the late colonial and early national eras. Through these explorations, Katharine seeks to reveal a more nuanced understanding of Early American political expression and the roles and responsibilities of women in this period.

altRong (Aries) Li
American History, S. Asia, Modern Europe
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Rong (Aries) received her B.A. and M.A. in History form Northeast Normal University in China.  Her research interests include U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War History, and the History of Sino-American Relations, with special interest in U.S. psychological warfare efforts, covert operations and intelligence activies during the Cold War.

 

 

 

 

 

 altRaechel Lutz
United States, STEH
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Raechel earned her B.A. in History and Art History from Ithaca College in 2007. While working at the Montclair Art Museum in Montclair, NJ, she earned her M.A. in History from Rutgers University - Newark in 2010. Currently a third year Ph.D. student, Raechel's research explores the intersections between nature, work, and identity in the U.S.

 

 

 

 

 

Tara Malanga
Latin American History, Global and Comparative
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Daniel Manuel
American, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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Daniel received a B.A. (2012) and an M.A. (2014) in history from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is a first-year doctoral student in American history and women’s and gender history. His interests include social movements and the politics of gender and sexuality in the 20th-century US South.

altHugo Marquez Soljancic
Medieval History, Women's and Gender
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Hugo earned his B.A. and M.A. at Wichita State University, concentrating on Western Europe in the Middle Ages. He is currently focusing on the intersections between sexual and gender constructions, natural philosophy, and heresy during the High Middle Ages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lytton McDonnell
United States, Cultural History
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Steven McGrail
American History, Women’s and Gender
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Patrick McGrath
American History, Cultural and Intellectual
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Laura Michel
Colonial American, Comparative, Early Modern European History
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Laura received her B.A. in history from Carleton College and her M.A. in Eighteenth-Century Worlds from the University of Liverpool. Her research interests include the history of poverty and crime in the eighteenth-century Atlantic World.

Damien Miller
American History, Women’s and Gender
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Christopher Mitchell
Women’s and Gender History, American
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altTaylor Moore
Middle Eastern History, Women's and Gender History
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Taylor received her BA in Honors Political Science and Sociology, specializing in Middle East Politics, from the American University in Cairo. Currently a second-year student in the doctoral program, her interests revolve around histories of the body, ‘technologies of the self,’ and the intersections of race and sexuality in the production of subjectivities, particularly with regards to processes of heterosocialization, in the Middle East and North Africa. Her most recent research explores how ‘modern’ notions of beauty and desirability were promoted through the racialization and “fashioning” of bodies in cosmetic and clothing advertisements in early 20th century Egypt.

 

 

 

 

Katherine Morris
Women's and Gender History, American, Diaspora
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Kenneth Moss
Latin American History, Women’s and Gender
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Anna Nath
Modern European History
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altDustin Neighly
Medieval History, Global and Comparative
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Dustin received his B.A. from the University of Washington.  Currently in his third year of the Rutgers PhD program, Dustin's research focuses on the intersections of power, resistance, and integration within the manorial system of medieval England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 altMatthew O’Brien
Early Modern European History, Modern Europe
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Svanur Petursson
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Marika Plater
American History, STEH
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Marika is a second year doctoral student at Rutgers after receiving a B.A. from Bard College in 2008 and an M.A. from Brooklyn College in 2013. Marika is interested in U.S. environmental history, particularly in diverse and divergent ideas about nature in late nineteenth and early twentieth-century New York City.

 

 

 

 

 

Kristin Canzano Pinyan
Medieval European History, Women’s and Gender
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Kristin earned her B.A. in Medieval Studies and English from Georgetown University in 2004 and her M.A. in Medieval Studies from Fordham University in 2005. She taught US history at a New Jersey high school before coming to Rutgers in 2007 to pursue a PhD in medieval European history. Her dissertation tentatively titled "Gentility and Status in Late Medieval England." Kristin also teaches Expository Writing and is a fellow at the Pre-Doctoral Leadership Development Institute.

Jazmin Puicon
Latin American History, Women’s and Gender History
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Jazmin received her BA from Union College (NY) and her MA from NYU in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.  She is a fifth year PhD student in Latin American History and Women's and Gender History working under the supervision of Professors Temma Kaplan, Aldo Lauria Santiago, and Mark Wasserman.  Focusing on barrio life in Cali after La Violencia in Colombia, her dissertation examines the participation of working-class men and women as they reclaimed their political rights and redefined cultural and gender norms through salsa music and oral history in Colombia.

altDavid Reid
American History, modern Mexico
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David earned a BA in Spanish and History from Dalhousie University in Halifax and an MA in History from York University in Toronto. His dissertation examines Mexican water politics in the Cold War, focusing on a dispute between Mexico and the United States over salt contamination in the Colorado River in the 1960s and early 70s. It explores environment, infrastructure, and economic development in statecraft and the links between local, national, and international politics.

 

 

 

 

 

 Benjamin Resnick-Day
Early American History, Atlantic
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altMelissa Reynolds
Early Modern European History, Medieval, Women's and Gender
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Melissa received her B.A. in English with Honors from the University of Alabama in 2005 and, after a few years toiling in an office, received her M.A. in History from the same institution in 2011.  She is interested in the expansion of literacy and visual practice in 15th- and 16th-century England, with a particular emphasis on images and readng practices among the semi-literate, includng women and children.  Her current work explores iconography and astrology in both manscript and print almanacs and prognostications.

 

 

 

 

Charles Riggs
American History
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Charlie Riggs is a third-year PhD student in American cultural and intellectual history, with interests in therapeutic culture, political economy, attitudes toward work, and the history of capitalism writ large. His current research examines the connection between white collar job-seeking, career development, and notions of selfhood in the twentieth-century United States. He earned his Bachelor's in History from Harvard College in 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

altNova Robinson
Women’s and Gender History, Global and Comparative
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Nova is a PhD Candidate in Women's and Gender History with a geographic concentration in the Middle East. Her dissertation "Lobbying the League: Syrian Women’s Transnational Pan-Arab Activism, 1913-1949" focuses on transnational Syrian women's networks in the early 20th century that lobbied the League of Nations on behalf of women's rights and Arab sovereignty. Research for this project was conducted in Arabic, French, and English language sources held in seventeen archives in Lebanon, France, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and the United States. Her research builds out of research into contemporary women’s activism conducted as a Fulbright Scholar in Jordan and Bahrain. Nova holds an A.B. cum laude in History from Dartmouth College (2008). Nova was a fellow at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis (2011-2012) and the Institute for Research on Women (2013-2014). She will defend her dissertation in February 2015.

 

 

Nelson Santana
Latin American, Comparative, American History
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Nelson obtained his B.A. in English from Baruch College (CUNY), his M.A. in the Study of the Americas from the City College of New York (CUNY), and his M.S. in Library and Information Science from Drexel University. His research centers on the cultural, and social history of Dominican migration in the United States. He is particularly interested in the types of social networks established by Dominican migrants in the sixties and seventies and their impact on the fabric of U.S. history.

Kristoffer Shields
Cultural History, History of Technology
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Raised in Florida, Kris has bounced around the Northeast since attending Yale University and receiving his B.A. in American Studies in 1997. He later received a J.D. from NYU and practiced law for just over two years before returning to academia. Kris studies legal and cultural history, particularly focusing on the relationship between famous trials and American culture. His current work examines a series of famous trials in the 1920s, analyzing their relationship to developing media technologies and changing cultural ideas about morality.

altPeter Sorensen
Latin American History, Comparative
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Peter earned his B.A. in History and Classical Studies from York University in Toronto and his M.A. in History from Trent University in Peterborough, Canada.  His research focuses on Pre-Columbian and Early Colonial Mexico with a focus on the Valley of Mexico.  Peter works with Nahuatl documents including the Cantares Mexicanos and The Florentine Codex to understand Pre-Columbian Social and Cultural History as well as their production as Colonial Documents.

 

 

 

 

 

altDustin Stalnaker
Modern European History, Comparative, Women's and Gender
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Dustin earned his BA in History from the University of Chicago in 2008 and his MA in History from the University of Missouri- Kansas City in 2013. His primary interests include working-class politics in Weimar and prewar Nazi Germany, international participation in the Spanish Civil War, and the historiography of antifascism since 1989.

 

 

 

 

 

altMatthew Carlos Stehney
American History, African-American
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Matthew Carlos Vargas Stehney received his BA in history and American culture from the University of Michigan.  He studies 20th Century U.S. social, cultural, and political history in the areas of race and ethnicity, social movements, and conversatism.  Matthew's current work explores Black Capitalism, the economic development of "the ghetto," and conservative political discourse since the 1950s. 

 

 

 

 

 

Brenann Sutter
American, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">Bren earned her BA in history and sociology from the University of California, San Diego in 2010. In 2012, she completed her MA in history at New York University. Bren is currently pursuing her PhD in twentieth-century American history with a concentration in women and gender. Her research explores tensions between economic citizenship, consumption, and social power. 

Rachael Swierzewski
American History
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 altLauren Swift
Early Modern History, Women's and Gender, Comparative
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Lauren,a second year PhD student, graduated from Earlham College in 2011 with a B.A. in History.  Lauren's interests include Early Modern northern Europe and Scandinavia, gender, and the construction of self and bodies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan Tate
American History,Women's and Gender, labor, social
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Ryan Tate is a second-year Ph.D. student studying the 20th Century United States. His interests range widely in U.S. social politics; culture and society; political economy; labor and work; and families and domesticities. His current research focuses on the New Deal and mid-century Farm Bloc, looking at broad transformations in commodity systems, rural culture, and the Cold War politics around the “family farm." He completed his B.A. in honors history at Hamline University.

Lance Thurner
Latin American History, American
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altDara Walker
African American History
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Dara received her B.A. in African American Studies from Eastern Michigan University in 2009 and a M.A. in Pan-African Studies from Syracuse University in 2011.  She is currently a fourth year doctoral student in African American History where her research explores urban history, women’s history, and 20th century U.S. social history. She is principally interested in the ways in which postwar high school student activism in Detroit shaped and was shaped by city politics, the black labor movement and calls for community control of educational institutions.

 

 

 

 

Danielle Willard
Modern European, Jewish, Women's and Gender History
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Danielle received her B.A. in History and English from Westmont College, her M.A. in History in collaboration with Jewish Studies from the University of Toronto, and her M.St. in Jewish Studies from the University of Oxford. She is currently a first-year doctoral student working on Modern European and Women's and Gender Studies. In particular, her research focuses on post-Holocaust refugees, migration, and families in Western Europe.

Kyle Williams
American History
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Kyle received his Bachelor's from the University of Oklahoma in 2011, where he studied history and classical languages. His current interests lie in the 19th- and early 20th-century United States, broadly in intellectual and cultural history, Populism, and the history of capitalism.

altJennifer Wilson
Early Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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altAlexandra Winnik
Modern European History, Global and Comparative
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Alexandra received her BA in History at Columbia University in 2003, and finished her Master’s program at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs in 2008. Her research explores the relationship between collective memories of the twentieth century and European states' human rights-related foreign policy in the post-World War II era. Her dissertation will examine this relationship in regard to German and British engagement in the Balkan wars of the 1990s.

 

 

 

 

 

Sara Wisdom
Early Modern European History
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altAdam Wolkoff
United States History, African-American History
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Adam is a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in the history department. He earned a B.A. in History from Columbia University in 2004 and a J.D. from the University of Connecticut in 2008. Combining legal and cultural history, his dissertation analyzes how multiple sources of property law shaped the development of rural and urban landscapes in the nineteenth century United States. He focuses on patterns of conflict and cooperation between landlords, tenants, and their creditors that emerged with the spread of free labor and the rise of commercial agriculture. Prior to attending Rutgers, he worked as a judicial law clerk and as a public sector consultant.  He has published articles on the history of public housing and on historic preservation programs.

 

 

 

Jasmin Young
African-American History, American
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 altKevin Young
Latin American, Caribbean History, Global and Comparative
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Kevin is a retired U.S. Navy cryptologic officer and former stay-at-home Dad who began his third career with a B.A. (2009) and M.A. (2011) in World History from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, NJ, where he now serves as an Adjunct Instructor of Western Civ. He is interested in all concepts related to identity and ideology, especially where they intersect with social power structures. His concentrations at RU are Latin America/Caribbean and Global/Comparative. He is looking forward to modeling bond servitude forms and the commoditization of ideology. He is fluent in Spanish and Russian.

 

 

 

 

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Amy Zanoni
American History, Women's and Gender, African-American
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Amy received a BA in Latin American & Caribbean Studies and Cultural Studies from McGill University in 2008, and an MA in Historical Studies from the University of Maryland Baltimore County in 2013.  Amy is interested in the interaction between feminism and struggles for economic and racial justice in the twentieth-century US.  Her work focuses on the way that these social movements are shaped by and rooted in place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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