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Graduate Student Contacts

Students are listed alphabetically by last name

 
 

Beatrice J. Adams
African-American History, American, Women's & Gender 
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Beatrice graduated with a B.A. in History from Fisk University in 2012 and with a M.A. in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago in 2013. She is interested in African American History and History of the American South. Specifically she is interested in how education, business ownership, and gender influenced individuals’ decisions to not participate in the Great Migration.

 

 

 

 

 Shaun Armstead
Women's and Gender, American History, Global and Comparative
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Shaun Armstead is a third-year doctoral student who graduated with her B.A. degree in History from Auburn University in 2015. She studies women’s transnational activism after World War II. Specifically she focuses on the interactions between women from the global North and global South and how imperial dynamics shaped and limited their ability to work together to establish universal peace. Central to her research is understanding how the concept of the nation fits into transnational visions for a better world.

 

 

 

 

  Yarden Avital
Modern European History, Global and Comparative
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Yarden received her BA  in history and linguistics from Tel Aviv university. Her MA is also from TAU, in the unit for culture research. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Modern European History. Her research centers around Soviet history, Soviet Jewry, memory and history, oral history, discourse and narrative analysis, and psychoanalysis and Lacanian Theory.

 

 

 

 

 

Catherine Babikian
Women's and Gender History,Modern European, STEH
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Catherine received her BA in history and BS in anthropology from the University of Iowa in 2015. Her research focuses on gender, race, and health care in twentieth-century Britain.

 

 

 

 

 

 Baker JesseJesse Bayker
Women's and Gender History, United States
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Jesse received a B.A. in History and LGBTQ Studies from CUNY Brooklyn College in 2010. He is a Ph.D. candidate and is currently writing his dissertation, "Before Transsexuality: Crossing the Borders of Gender in the United States, 1850-1960." His project examines transgender practices and narratives before the advent of sex reassignment surgeries. He is a recipient of the 2015 Schlesinger Library Dissertation Grant. For the 2015-2016 academic year, he holds a Graduate Assistant position at the Rutgers Center for Race and Ethnicity. He is also a fellow in the Rutgers Pre-doctoral Leadership Development Institute and co-chair of the History Department’s Committee on Minority Student Affairs.

 

 

 

Bedward MoyaMoyagaye Bedward
Middle East, African History
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Zachary Bennett
Early America, Atlantic World, African Diaspora
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Zachary is a fifth year PhD student studying early America and the Atlantic World. His dissertation "Flowing Power: Rivers, Energy, and the Making of New England" examines the political ecology of waterpower before the industrial revolution. Zachary has forthcoming articles appearing in the New England Quarterly and Register of the Kentucky Historical Society on environmental history topics.

 

 

 

 

 

Christopher Blakley
Colonial, STEH, Early Modern European History
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Christopher Blakley is a doctoral candidate specializing in environmental history and the history of science in colonial North America, the British West Indies, and Atlantic Africa. Their dissertation, Inhuman Empire: Enslaved People and Nonhuman Animals in the British Atlantic World, asks how interactions between enslaved Africans and nonhuman animals throughout the diaspora shaped imperialism and colonization in the eighteenth-century British Atlantic. Their research has been supported by The Social Science Research Council, The John Carter Brown Library, and The Huntington Library.

 

 

 

 

 

AJ Blandford
United States,STEH
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AJ received a BA in Architecture and Visual Arts from Barnard College. Her research is focused on the environmental and cultural histories of North American mining and the global metals trade in the 18th and early 19th century.

 

 

 

 

 

M. Dale Booth
Modern European History, Women's and Gender
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Dale received a B.A. in History and Anthropology and a M.A. in Comparative History from the College of William and Mary. Currently a fourth year doctoral student, Dale studies eighteenth and nineteenth-century British history, with a specific focus on gender, sexuality, and science. Dale’s dissertation addresses the intersection of natural history and gendered discourses along British coasts and waterways.

 

 

 

 

 

Daniel Bottino
Early Modern European History
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Danny received his BA in History and Psychology from Tufts University and his MA in European Studies at Yale University.  At Yale, he wrote his Master’s Thesis, “Landscape, Memory and the Early Modern Sense of the Past,” on the role of social memory in early modern England, focusing specifically on its interaction with the monumental landscape.  At Rutgers, he plans to pursue similar research topics, but within a wider geographic range including New England and the early modern Atlantic world.  Danny is from Kittery Point, Maine, and is also researching topics in the social history of seventeenth and eighteenth-century Maine. 

 

 

 

 

 Julia Bowes
United States, Women's and Gender History
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Julia is a sixth year doctoral candidate. Before moving to the United States to pursue graduate student, Julia completed a Bachelor of Arts (Hons I) at Sydney University, a Master’s in Public Policy at the Australian National University and worked in the women’s non-profit sector. She is interested in the intersections between the history of the family and the history the state, particularly in looking at the patriarchal family unit as a mode of governance and part of the apparatus of the state in the nineteenth and twentieth century U.S. Her dissertation “The Government of the Family: The Child, the Growth of the State and the Remaking of Patriarchal Authority 1850-1930” explores how the direct regulation of children by the state transformed the nature of state power and challenged existing familial governance arrangements, provoking a form of anti-statism rooted in a gendered defense of family sovereignty that produced the modern right to family privacy.

 

 

 

  altDanielle Bradley
Medieval European History,Global and Comparative
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Danielle has a B.A. from the University of Iowa, an M.A. from Reading University in medieval archaeology, and an MA from the University of Connecticut in medieval studies. Her research interests include chronicles and bureaucratic culture in later medieval England.

 

 

 

 

 

Doris Brossard
American, Women's and Gender History
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Doris graduated with a B.A. in history and French literature from the University of Rennes (Rennes II, France) and a M.A. in history from the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon (France).  She is interested in twentieth American history and her research focuses on gender and social movements after World War II. 

 

 

 

 

 

  Brian Brown
Latin American History, American, Global and Comparative
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Brian is a fourth year doctoral candidate at Rutgers.  His primary research interests include business, economic, and urban history in Southern Mexico during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  He earned a B.A. in Political Science from Southwestern University in 2001, a M. Ed. in Secondary Education from Texas State University in from Texas State University in 2011, and a M.A. in History from Texas State University in 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

Julia Buck
Modern European History, Women's and Gender, Latin American
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Julia received B.A.s in History with departmental honors and Spanish Language and Literature from Portland State University in 2013. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Modern European History. Her research centers around gender, migration, and clandestinity in interwar and World War II Europe. She is interested in the ways in which exile and refugee women re-established their social and political networks; interacted across cultures; and responded to displacement, trauma, and war.

 

 

 

 

Rachel Bunker
American History, STEH
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Rachel is currently a fourth year doctoral candidate at Rutgers studying twentieth century politics, finance, and empire. Her dissertation "An Invisible Empire" examines British and American empire, actuarial science, fire, earthquakes, and civil commotion in the Caribbean from the 1890s to the 1960s. She received her B.A. in History from Agnes Scott College in 2009, MAT from Lewis & Clark College in 2010, and her MA in History from UGA in 2012.

 

 

 

 

Hilary Buxton
Modern European History, Britain,Empire, Women’s and Gender
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Hilary received her B.A. in History from Smith College in 2011.  She studies nineteenth and twentieth century body politics, gender, and medicine within the British Empire.  Her dissertation "Disabled Empire: Race, Rehabilitation, and the Politics of Healing Non-white Colonial Troops, 1914-1940" examines the bodily experience of Indian and West Indian servicemen in the Great War and its aftermath, to question how racial ideologies shaped the new healing industries and trauma care.  Building a narrative of colonial soldiers, physicians, nutritionists, and psychiatrists, mental hospitals and rehabilitation centers, prosthetics manufacturers and pension officials, it traces the rise of a multiracial medical and welfare system that stretched throughout the empire.

 

 

  altMiya Carey
African-American History
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Miya is currently a sixth year in the history department.  She received her bachelor's degree in History and Pan-African Studies from Drew University.  Her research centers on African American and interracial organizations for girls.  Miya is interested in how notions of African American girlhood were shaped and contested in the twentieth century.

 

 

 

 

 altSatyasikha (Shihka) Chakraborty
Women's and Gender History, Global and Comparative
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Shihka studied History at Jadavpur University in India before joining Rutgers in 2012. She is interested in histories of gender, race and labor in colonial households and her geographical focus is South Asia. She is currently working on ayahs - native female servants - who worked in Euro-Indian households from the eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries, with a particular focus on colonial visual culture.

 

 

 

 

 Yulia Chernyavskaya
Modern European History, Women's and Gender, Global and Comparative
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I graduated from Saint-Petersburg State University in 2010 as a «Specialist» in history. In 2017 I received my MA at European University at Saint-Petersburg where I majored in memory studies. My master thesis was about memory politics in Soviet Union in the late-Stalin and early Khrushchev eras. I concentrated on the image of the 'First Chekist’ Felix Dzerzhinsky and how it was created in film. I’m interested Soviet history, Soviet film, cultural memory and subjectivity. 

 

 

 

 

  altChristina Chiknas
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Christina earned a B.A. in History and Philosophy from Georgia State University in 2009. Currently, she researches the mass visualization of cosmopolitanism in early twentieth-century Europe, with a particular focus on consumer culture in Germany and France. Her dissertation project takes up the intersection between formal politics and cosmopolitan performances in a pan-European context, analyzing how masquerades influenced the turbulence of early twentieth-century politics.

 

 

 

 

altThomas Cossentino
United States, Political, African-American History
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Tom is a doctoral candidate from Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. After attending Delaware County Community College, he transferred to Villanova University, where he earned a B.A. (2009) and an M.A. (2011) in history. He studies twentieth century U.S. history, and his particular interests include social and political history and U.S. foreign relations. His dissertation investigates the different ways that military service in the Vietnam War shaped American veterans' ideas about their nation and its place in the world. 

 

 

 

 

 altJessica Lauren Criales
Early American History, Early Modern Europe
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Jessica is a PhD candidate in the areas of Colonial Latin America and Colonial US. Her interests include gender, religion, and indigenous practices of Christianity. Her dissertation analyzes the experiences of women in "Christian Indian" spaces in both Mexico and the United States from 1700-1870. In particular, her works centers on a convent for Zapotec and Mixtec women in Oaxaca, Mexico, and the Brothertown community in upstate New York, formed by members of various coastal New England tribes. She has a BA in History from the University of Notre Dame (2008) and a Master's in Spanish and Latin American Linguistic, Cultural, & Literary Studies from NYU (2012).

 

 

 

 Henry Crouse
Early US, Native American
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Henry graduated with a BAS in Secondary Education and American History from Salve Regina University in 2010. He earned his MA in Global and Comparative History from Rutgers University in 2014. He earned an MA from Brown University in 2015. Henry is interested in the American History, Indigenous History, and Global History. His research centers around Indigenous mythology and relations between Native Americans and European colonists in the colonial Mid-Atlantic. 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Ernie-Steighner
Women's and Gender History
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Jennifer received her B.A. in History and Women’s Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay and her M.A. in U.S. History and Gender Studies from Miami University. Prior to pursuing doctoral studies at Rutgers, she consulted for a variety of equity-focused organizations including the University of Minnesota, The Advocates for Human Rights, and Regions Hospital. Her research focuses on gendered and raced histories of chronic disease, biomedical technologies, feminist and medical articulations of the body, popular health movements, and public health policy in the United States.

 

 

 

 

 Kaisha Esty
African American History, Women's and Gender
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Kaisha earned her B.A. and MRes in American Studies from the University of Nottingham in the UK. She is currently a fourth year doctoral student at Rutgers where she studies African American and women’s and gender history. Fixated on competing notions of purity, Kaisha’s research explores the relationship between moral values and meanings of citizenship in the thought of African American women from Emancipation to the early 20th century.

 

 

 

 

 Whitney Fields
African American History, American
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Whitney Fields is currently a first year doctoral student at Rutgers University where she studies African American history, American history, and cultural history. She received a B.A. in History and American Studies from the College of William and Mary in 2015. Her research explores the uses of plantation burial grounds by enslaved people. Drawing on testimony and nineteenth century narratives written by formerly enslaved people, she locates the grave as a space where enslaved people formed community, resisted the demands of enslavement, and reinterpreted meanings of freedom. 

 

 

 

 

 Hannah Frydman
Modern European History, France, Women's and Gender
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Hannah is a doctoral candidate interested in urban history, cultural histories of the economy, the history of advertising and the press, the history of medicine, and histories of women, gender, and sexuality. Her dissertation, tentatively entitled “Between the Lines: Sex, Desire, and the Economies of Daily Life in Parisian Classifieds, 1881-1940,” charts the history of the development of advertising in the Parisian press under the French Third Republic and examines the ways in which the presence of this morally ambivalent classified marketplace (filled with ads for domestic servants and prostitutes, fortune tellers and furnished rooms), which facilitated the “golden age of the French press,” also shaped sexual norms and social mores, the place of women in society, and the bounds of Republican freedom itself. Hannah’s work has been supported by the Social Science Research Council and the Chateaubriand Fellowship.

 

 

 

 Ian Gavigan
US History
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Ian Gavigan is a first-year PhD student who studies 20th century U.S. history. His main interests include (but are not limited to) political history, northern school segregation & public school districts, political economy, African American history, the Left, urban history, and global history. Ian graduated from Haverford College where he studied History and German. 

 

 

 

 

 

 Marlene Gaynair
African Diaspora, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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M. Hyacinth Gaynair is a fourth year doctoral student in the Department of History, where she studies the African Diaspora/Atlantic World and African-American history. She received her Honours B.A. and a M.A. in History at York University in Toronto, which influenced her work as a Black Atlantic Canadian scholar of Jamaican descent. Inspired by a love for beef patties and protective styles, her research examines the social and cultural histories of the Jamaican diaspora in the twentieth century. She particularly focuses on collective identities contextualized through memory, race, gender, identity, and citizenship. M. Hyacinth Gaynair is also affiliated with the Rutgers Advanced Institute for Critical Caribbean Studies, the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, and the Rutgers Digital Humanities Initiative.

Check out her on-going digital humanities project, Islands in the North: Making Space and Place in Black Toronto, at islandsinthenorth.com

 

  Hannah Groch-Begley
Modern European, Women's and Gender History
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Hannah received her B.A. in History with honors from Vassar College in 2012. Prior to pursuing her PhD, she worked as a professional researcher in D.C. political nonprofits, focused on narratives and depictions of gender and disability. Her academic research focuses on nineteenth and twentieth century gender, citizenship, and mental health in the British Empire. 

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick Harris
Modern European History, Comparative, American
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Patrick's research focuses on the intellectual history of empire in the 18th and 19th centuries, including debates surrounding slavery and abolition, counterrevolutionary thought, and concepts of culture. He is currently studying the impact of French emigres from colonial backgrounds on the emergence of pan-European conceptions of imperialism in the Age of Revolutions. Patrick received a B.A. in History-International Studies and Philosophy from Rhodes College in 2013.

 

 

 

 

Sam Hege
STEH, Global and Comparative History
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Sam is currently a second year doctoral student that studies the history of environmental justice and political economy in the 20th century. With a particular interest in New York City and its position in a global economy of food, his dissertation project examines the productive and consumptive history of beef, chronic illness, and the efforts to construct alternative and more just encounters with food, energy, and waste. He completed his B.A. at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2011, an MSc at Edinburgh University in 2013, and an MA in Global and Comparative History at Rutgers in 2016.Sam is a first-year doctoral student. He completed his undergraduate degree at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2011 and an M.A. in the Global and Comparative History program at Rutgers in 2016. He is interested in 20th century Environmental history, particularly in understanding the relationship between food production and consumption and the social, physical, and political consequences of these processes.

 

 

 Alison Hight
Modern European History, Britain, Global and Comparative
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Alison earned a B.A. in History and Classical Studies and an M.A. in History from Virginia Tech. She is currently a first-year doctoral student in modern European history. Alison is interested in the construction of cultural heritage and national identity in 19th and early 20th century Britain, particularly from a 4-nations perspective.

 

 

 

 

 

Travis Jeffres
Transnational/Borderlands, Native American History
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Travis is a Ph.D. candidate specializing in borderlands and Native American history. His dissertation was researched in archives in Mexico and the United States and traces the historical experiences of native peoples in diaspora in the Greater Southwest. A transnational study of migration and exploitation, it offers fresh insight into the experiences of Native Americans under Spanish colonial rule in the region by analyzing sources written in an indigenous language (Nahuatl). He is recipient of The Americas Research Network Transnationalism Fellowship as well as the Rutgers University Warren and Beatrice Susman Dissertation Fellowship.

 

 

 

 Tracey Johnson
African American History
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Joseph Kaplan
African American History
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Joe Kaplan is a first year doctoral student in African American History. Joe received his B.A. in History at the University of Puget Sound. His undergraduate thesis examined the exile of Black Panther, Assata Shakur and her articulation of a transnational identity through the figure of the maroon. Joe is interested in the history of the Black Power era in a global context, African American women's movement beyond U.S. borders, and the carceral state. 

 

 

 

 

 altJulia Katz
United States, Global and Comparative History
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Julia received her B.A. in Africana Studies from New York University in 2011.  She is a fifth year doctoral student at Rutgers studying U.S. and Hawaiian history.  Her research examines Asian migration to Hawaii, focusing on intimacies between migrant Asians and indigenous Polynesians, and Asian accommodations to American empire.

 

 

 

 

 

 altWilliam Kelly
Latin American History, United States
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William is a 2016-2017 Mellon CLIR dissertation research fellow and a fourth-year student in the department with a focus on Latin American and Caribbean history. His dissertation will explore housing policy, community, and everyday life in Cuba in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s. William holds a master's degree in history from the University of Chicago and a bachelor's degree in anthropology from the University of South Florida. He is currently in Cuba.

 

 

 

 

Eri Kitada
United States, Women's and Gender History
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I'm studying modern history of the United States from a global and comparative perspective.

I'm also a geographer to question assumptions on various spaces such as the past, bodies, and academic disciplines.

My project triangulates the Philippines, US, and Japan as a study of race, gender/sexuality, and imperialism. I graduated with a B.A. in Humanities and Human Sciences from Hokkaido University in 2008 and with a M.A. in Area Studies (American Studies Program) from University of Tokyo in 2013, Japan.

 

 

 

 Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders
Modern American History, African-American
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Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders is a doctoral candidate studying African American Civil War memory, African American cultural and intellectual history, and the legacy of the Lost Cause movement. She is currently working on her dissertation, “Confronting the Rebel Yell: How African Americans Created and Contested Civil War Memory, 1865-1965.” She received a B.A. in Political Science from Wake Forest University and a M.A. in Human Rights Studies from Columbia University.Ashleigh Lawrence-Sanders is a doctoral candidate studying African American Civil War memory, African American cultural and intellectual history, and the legacy of the Lost Cause movement. She is currently working on her dissertation, “Confronting the Rebel Yell: How African Americans Created and Contested Civil War Memory, 1865-1965.” She received a B.A. in Political Science from Wake Forest University and a M.A. in Human Rights Studies from Columbia University.

 

 

Rong (Aries) Li
American History, Modern Asian History
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Rong (Aries) received her B.A. and M.A. in History form Northeast Normal University in China. She is interested in U.S. Foreign Relations. Her research focuses on the twentieth century U.S.-East Asian relations, with a special interest in war memories, perceptions, and propaganda.

 

 

 

 

 

Raechel Lutz
United States, STEH
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Raechel is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at the Rutgers University, with interests in American history, environmental history, cultural history,  the history of toxicity and toxic landscapes, and energy history. Her dissertation is tentatively titled, “A Refined State: A Environmental History of Petroleum Refining in New Jersey, 1860-2015.” Drawing on a wide range of sources, her research focuses on how oil refining has influenced history and shaped the ways modern people interact with and rely on petroleum. In so doing, she pays particular attention how Standard Oil’s Bayway and Bayonne refineries located in Northeastern New Jersey reshaped the land, people, culture, and politics on a both local and national scale. Her doctoral research has been supported through fellowships and grants from the American Society for Environmental History, and the Chemical Heritage Foundation, the Graduate School of Rutgers University, the New Jersey Historical Commission, the Rockefeller Archive Center, and the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis. Raechel earned a Master of Arts degree in History from Rutgers University-Newark in 2010 and a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Ithaca College in 2007. Raechel has published, “Still Life with Vitamins: Art and Science at the 1939 New York World’s Fair” in Environmental History and several book reviews. Raechel can be reached at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Xavier Macy
African American History, STEH
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Xavier entered the doctoral program after completing an M.A. in History at James Madison University after beginning his career in academia at City College of San Francisco. He is interested in the intersections of African American history, the history of technology, environmental history, and the carceral state.

 

 

 

 

 

 Tara Malanga
Latin American History, Global and Comparative
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Tara earned her B.A. in History from Rutgers University and her M.Ed. in Social Studies Education from The Graduate School of Education also at Rutgers University.  Her research focuses on the change in indigenous perceptions of disease, illness, death, and dying in Mexico from the Pre-Columbian to the Colonial period.  Tara is currently working with Nahuatl language documents including the Cantares Mexicanos, a number of historical annals written by various Nahua noblemen, wills and testaments from areas in and around the Valley of Mexico, morality plays, and a record keeping book titled El Libro de los Difuntos, to understand how disease and death were recorded and represented both before and after Spanish contact.

 

 

 

Kathleen Manning
Early Modern European History, Women's and Gender
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Daniel Manuel
American, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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Daniel earned his BA (2012) and MA (2014) in history at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is a third-year PhD student in the women’s and gender history program. Broadly, his interests are gender, race, sexuality, and health in the 20th-century US South. More specifically, Daniel is looking at the everyday politics and social history of health care in Louisiana’s early HIV epidemic.

 

 

 

 

 

 Hugo Marquez Soljancic
Medieval History, Women's and Gender
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Hugo earned his B.A. and M.A. at Wichita State University, concentrating on Western Europe in the Middle Ages. He is currently focusing on the intersections between sexual and gender constructions, natural philosophy, and heresy during the High Middle Ages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lytton McDonnell
United States, Cultural History
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Lytton is a PhD candidate interested in the historical intersections of music, emotion, and altered states of consciousness in the United States and the "trance"-Atlantic world. Originally from Canada, he has earned history degrees from the University of Ottawa (BA, 2004) and the University of Victoria (MA, 2009) as well as a diploma in music composition from Selkirk College (2006). His dissertation explores various manifestations of musical trance during the late-19th and early-20th centuries, including the melodious ecstasies of Pentecostal revivalists, the sublime raptures of opera-goers, and consumer “play” — that experience of getting caught up or lost in cultural products and practices, which lies at the heart of modern entertainment.

 

 

 

Celso Mendoza
Latin American History, Early American
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I became fascinated and enamored with Mexico's indigenous cultures ever since I first visited Mexico City as an undergraduate. After seeing the city's extensive archaeological museums, I bought nearly every book on the Aztecs and their language that I could find at the gift shops there. This fascination soon grew into an obsession so great that I changed my major to history. I graduated soon thereafter with a BA in history from UC Davis and then went on to earn an MA in Latin American Studies at UCLA in 2016. While at UCLA, I won a fellowship to study Nahuatl, the Aztec language, with native speakers at Yale in the summer of 2015. As a PhD in history at Rutgers I am looking forward to pursuing a dissertation project involving Nahuatl documents under the supervision of Camilla Townsend, an expert on everything Aztec. I can be reached at celsoam at outlook dot com.

 

 

   Paul Mercandetti
Modern European History
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Laura Michel
Colonial American, Comparative, Early Modern European History
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Laura received her B.A. in History from Carleton College (2012) and her M.A. in Eighteenth Century Worlds (2013) from the University of Liverpool. Her research interests include the history of poverty and crime in the United States and Europe during the eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries. Laura's dissertation explores transnational networks of philanthropy and reform, particularly in the Anglo and Dutch Atlantic Worlds.

 

 

 

 

 Ariel Mond
Modern France, Empire
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Ariel received her BA in History and French Studies from American University in Washington, DC (2015) and her MA in French Studies from New York University (2017). She is a first year doctoral candidate studying modern European history with research interests in France, empire, and Jewish history. Her previous work has focused on intersections of Jewish history and French colonialism in the twentieth century, particularly surrounding the decolonization of Algeria in 1962. 

 

 

 

 

Taylor Moore
Middle Eastern History, Women's and Gender
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Taylor M. Moore is a PhD Candidate specializing in Modern Middle Eastern History. Her dissertation, “Superstitious Women: Race, Magic, and Medicine in Upper Egypt (1875-1960),” explores the role that local female healers, or wise women, played in the development of anthropological and medical expertise in early twentieth century Egypt, both as scientific actors and objects of study. In addition to Arabic and Ottoman Turkish archival materials, her work uses amulets, talismans, and other magico-medicinal objects as historical sources to understand the medicinal, spiritual, and political economies of the Upper Egyptian peasantry. Taylor received a dual bachelor’s degree in Honors Political Science and Sociology from the American University in Cairo in 2013. She is a Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellow and a Fellow-in-Residence at the Consortium for the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Philadelphia for the 2017-2018 academic year.

 

 

 Timur Mukhamatulin
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Timur is a second-year Ph.D. student. His field of interest is a history of post-war USSR. Mainly he is focused on gender history, history of sports, and history of youth. He has a B.A. degree from Russian State University for Humanities received in 2008 and Russian degree of candidate (kandidat nauk) received in 2013. 

 

 

 

 

 

Catherine Harris Naeve
Early Modern History,British Isles, Global and Comparative
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Catherine is currently a fourth-year doctoral student whose research focuses on the British Isles in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth-century, with an emphasis on state formation, immigration, citizenship and identity, and religious toleration situated in European and imperial contexts. She graduated with a B.A. in History, Plan II, and European Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014.

 

 

 

 

  Anna Nath
Modern European History
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altDustin Neighly
Medieval History, Global and Comparative
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Dustin received his B.A. from the University of Washington.  Currently in his third year of the Rutgers PhD program, Dustin's research focuses on the intersections of power, resistance, and integration within the manorial system of medieval England.

 

 

 

 

 

 altMatthew O’Brien
Early Modern European History, Modern Europe
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Jerrad P. Pacatte
African American History, Women’s and Gender, Modern U.S.
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Chairperson, Interpreting American History Graduate Workshop and Lecture Series, 2017-18 academic year - “The Scars of the Past: Violence in American History and Memory”

A second-year doctoral student in the Department of History at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Jerrad Pacatte’s research and teaching interests survey late nineteenth/early twentieth century African American women’s social and intellectual history. Jerrad’s research concentrates on the experiences of African American women in the Northeastern United States at the turn of the twentieth century; specifically, his work seeks to explore the relationship between black women’s migration to urban centers of the north and the response of white communities to their arrival vis-à-vis anti-black rhetoric, violence, and policing. Before attending Rutgers, Jerrad received his Bachelor’s of Science degree, summa cum laude, from the State University of New York at Oneonta. While at Oneonta, he completed an honors senior thesis supported by the State University of New York Research Foundation, worked as an editor for the New York Quarterly history journal, and served as a teaching assistant in the Department of History.

 

Alexander Petrusek
Modern European History, Global and Compartiver
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Alexander is a second year doctoral student in the Department of History at Rutgers, focusing on modern European and German history. His area of study is the communist German Democratic Republic (GDR, or East Germany). His projected dissertation, Real Existing Idealism: East Germany and the Socialist Imaginary 1971-1995, traces the works of East German civic and socialist activists and their contributions to the development of European leftist thought. Employing the concept of the imaginary, it seeks to explore the generation and circulation of political understandings in a space beyond traditional liberal/totalitarian, public/private, and representation/practice binaries.

 

 

 

  Svanur Petursson
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Marika Plater
U.S. History, STEH
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Marika is a fourth year doctoral student at Rutgers after receiving a B.A. from Bard College in 2008 and an M.A. from Brooklyn College in 2013. Marika studies working-class landscapes of leisure in and around late nineteenth and early twentieth-century New York City.

 

 

 

 

 

Jazmin Puicon
Latin American History, Women’s and Gender
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Jazmin Puicon is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Rutgers, specializing in modern Latin American history and Women’s and Gender History. Her research examines how the working class in Cali, Colombia sustained families and communities by embracing popular democracy despite increased local and national political violence. Her dissertation, “Creating Cali: Gender, Race, Violence, and the Rise of Popular Democracy in the Barrios of Cali, Colombia, 1958-1984,” showcases the resiliency of everyday men and women who attempted to fight the violence with social organizations they had first conceived and developed in the countryside. In particular, her work highlights the role Afro-Colombian women played in creating and sustaining families, communities, and democracy during this period. Her dissertation also sheds light on how popular culture (particularly salsa music), working in conjunction with popular democratic groups, paved the way for the working class in Cali to become involved in city politics and community activism. She has presented her work at conferences in the United States and abroad, including the International Conference on Women’s History in Bogotá, Colombia (2017). She received her B.A. in Latin American and Caribbean Studies and Spanish Language and Culture from Union College (NY) in 2007. She earned her M.A. from NYU in Latin American and Caribbean Studies in 2009. She is currently the Warren and Beatrice Susman Dissertation Completion Fellow at Rutgers University. She can be reached at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

   Carie Rael
United States, Women and Gender History
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Carie Rael received her B.A. at California State University, Fullerton in Comparative Religion and History and later received her Master’s at California State University, Fullerton in History where she wrote her dissertation “How Students Shaped California’s Public Higher Education System.” Prior to entering Rutgers doctoral program, she worked at the Center for Oral and Public History. Her current research involves looking at Latina women who are organizing against police brutality in their communities in Southern California. 

 

 

 

 

  Melissa Reynolds
Early Modern European History, Medieval, Women's and Gender
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Melissa is a fifth-year doctoral candidate in early modern European history (emphasis on the British Isles). Her dissertation compares vernacular practical knowledge in fifteenth-century manuscript and sixteenth-century print as a means of exploring readers’ attitudes toward religion and magic, science and the social order, and print and the public sphere in early modern England. She received an MA in History (2011) and a BA in English (summa cum laude, 2005) from the University of Alabama. Her work has been supported by the Medieval Academy of America and the Richard III Society, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Folger Shakespeare Library.

 

 

 

  Charles Riggs
American History
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Charlie is a sixth-year PhD candidate in modern U.S. cultural and intellectual history, with interests in the histories of religion, theology, philosophy, and psychology. His current research examines the encounter between liberal Christianity and psychotherapy in post-World War II American intellectual life, focusing on the Protestant theologian and existentialist philosopher Paul Tillich. Charlie earned his Bachelor's in History from Harvard College in 2010.

 

 

 

 

Paul Sampson
STEH and Early Modern European History
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Paul is a third-year doctoral student in the history of science. His research focuses on improvement, cosmology, and global trade in early modern Britain and the Atlantic world. He received his B.A. in History from the University of Dallas in Irving, Texas in 2011 and his M.A. in Early Modern European and Early American History from Marquette University in 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

Katie Sinclair
European History, STEH
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Katherine is a second year doctoral student studying the far reaches of the French empire in the nineteenth and twentieth century. She is also interested in environmental history and the history of technology in an imperial context. She received her B.A. in history from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014, an M.A. in History and Literature from Columbia University in 2015, and a “Master de recherche” in contemporary European history from the Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne in 2016.

 

 

 

 

altPeter Sorensen
Latin American History, Comparative
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Peter earned his B.A. in History and Classical Studies from York University in Toronto and his M.A. in History from Trent University in Peterborough, Canada.  His research focuses on Pre-Columbian and Early Colonial Mexico with a focus on the Valley of Mexico.  Peter works with Nahuatl documents including the Cantares Mexicanos and The Florentine Codex to understand Pre-Columbian Social and Cultural History as well as their production as Colonial Documents.

 

 

 

 

Emmet von Stackelberg
American,  Cultural History
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Emmet is a first-year doctoral student, studying the cultural history of the United States in the early 20th century. His interests include the production, regulation, and proliferation of mass culture, and the technologies and industries surrounding early cinema. He received his BA in History and Literature from Harvard.

 

 

 

 

 

Dustin Stalnaker
Modern European History, Global and Comparative
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Dustin is a doctoral candidate whose research focuses on twentieth-century Europe, with a particular emphasis on Germany. His chief interests include the histories of political internationalism, anti-fascism, political violence, and leftist thought and action in the context of the “long" Cold War. His current project explores the political afterlives of veterans of the Spanish Civil War’s International Brigades. Dustin earned his BA in History from the University of Chicago in 2008 and his MA in History from the University of Missouri- Kansas City in 2013.

 

 

 

 

 Brenann Sutter
American, Women's and Gender, African-American History
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Bren earned her BA in history and sociology from the University of California, San Diego in 2010. In 2012, she completed her MA in history at New York University. Bren is currently pursuing her PhD in twentieth-century American history with a concentration in women and gender. Her research explores social negotiations between sexuality, citizenship, and consumerism.

 

 

 

 

 

 altLauren Swift
Early Modern History, Women's and Gender, Comparative
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Lauren,a fourth-year PhD student, graduated from Earlham College in 2011 with a B.A. in History.  Lauren's interests include Early Modern northern Europe and Scandinavia, gender, and the construction of self and bodies.

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan Driskell Tate
American History,Women's and Gender, labor, social
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Ryan Driskell Tate is a Ph.D. candidate in U.S. history at Rutgers. His research examines twentieth-century labor, politics, and the environment in the American West. His dissertation, “The Saudi Arabia of Coal,” is a history energy development on the northern Great Plains since the 1960s. He received his B.A. in honors History at Hamline University in 2012. His essays and articles on rural populism, the 1970s energy crisis, and coal strip-mining are forthcoming in 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 Brooke A. Thomas
African American History, Women's and Gender
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Brooke A. Thomas graduated with a B.A. in History from Spelman College in 2013 and with an M.A. in History from the University of South Alabama in 2016. She is interested in 20th century African American History, women and gender history and Girlhood Studies. Specifically, her research seeks to explore the relationship between the cultural, political, and social movements that comprised the Black Power and black cultural nationalism movements and youth organizations for black girls in the 1960s and 1970s. 

 

 

 

 

 

Lance C. Thurner
Latin American History, American
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I am a historian of science and imperialism, with wide interests in historical methods and pedagogy.  My dissertation focuses on the vogue for “Indian medicines” in the latter part of Spain’s imperial enterprise in Mexico.  I examine the ideological transformation of the Indian from royal subject to national asset through the imaginaries of public health.  I am particularly interested in the idea of Christian zeal: how this served the imperial project, scientific objectives, and professional and proto-national identities. 

Previously I earned my BA in History from Indiana University and a MA from Columbia University’s Oral History Master Program.

 

 

 

 Enibokun Uzebu
Women’s, Gender and Legal History
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Enibokun Uzebu is a doctoral student at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. She is a visiting Fulbright Pre-dissertation student to Rutgers University. She received a B.A. degree in History in 2006 and M.A degree in History in 2013 from the University of Benin, Nigeria. She also received a Postgraduate Diploma in Education from Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria in 2010. She is a Lecturer in the Department of History, University of Benin, Nigeria. Her research interrogates the increasing visibility of women in the Judiciary in Nigeria. Specifically, she examines the entrance of women into a male dominated profession (The Judiciary) with a view to identifying the factors responsible for the increase in the number of women judges.

 

 

 

Lisette Varon Carvajal
Women’s and Gender History, STEH
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Lisette is currently a second year doctoral student in the History department. Prior to attending Rutgers, she earned her bachelor degree at Los Andes University in Bogotá, Colombia, with a major in Political Science, and two minors in History and Law. Lisette's is interested in the late eighteenth century and early nineteenth century Latin America History, Gender, Feminism and History of Science.

 

 

 

 

 

 Dara Walker
African American History
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Dara received her B.A. in African American Studies from Eastern Michigan University in 2009 and a M.A. in Pan-African Studies from Syracuse University in 2011.  She is currently a sixth year doctoral student in African American History where her research explores urban history, women’s history, and 20th century U.S. social history. She is principally interested in the ways in which postwar high school student activism in Detroit shaped and was shaped by city politics, the black labor movement and calls for community control of educational institutions.

 

 

 

 

 Pamela Walker
African American History, Women's and Gender
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Pamela graduated with a B.A. in History and a Minor in Journalism and Electronic Media from The University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 2011.  She received her M.A. in History from the University of New Orleans in 2015. She is interested in African American History, History of the American South, and Women’s and Gender History. Pamela is specifically interested in the intersections of race, class, gender, and intergenerational constraints surrounding women’s participation in the modern civil rights movement.

 

 

 

 

 Henry Warburton
Early Modern Atlantic/Britain
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Henry is a first-year PhD student studying the Atlantic world in the long eighteenth century. He graduated from Brandeis University in 2017 with a B.A. in History and Physics. His previous research includes work on labor culture and class conflict in British government dockyards between 1730 and 1790. Currently, his interests include identity creation in maritime communities and the role of working class ideologies in empire and politics. 

 

 

 

 

  Meagan Wierda
19th C. US History, STEH
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Meagan is a second-year PhD student jointly interested in the history of slavery and the history of medicine in the United States during the nineteenth century. Her interests center on questions of race, embodiment, and knowledge production. More particularly, she is looking to examine how African-American abolitionists mounted a specifically scientific challenge to slavery in the decades leading up to the Civil War. Before coming to Rutgers, Meagan earned an MA in history from Concordia University (Montréal) and a BA in history and lettres françaises from the University of Ottawa.

 

 

 

 

Caitlin Wiesner
Women's and Gender History, African American
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Caitlin is currently a third year PhD student specializing in women's and gender history in the 20th century United States. She earned her B.A. with Distinguished Honors in History and Women's & Gender Studies from The College of New Jersey in 2015. Her research interests include the history of feminism, race, sexual violence, and criminalization in the late 20th century United States. Her current research examines how African American women contributed to grassroots anti-rape organizations in the 1970s and 1980s as feminist advocacy professionalized and state funding sources grew increasingly carceral. 

 

   Danielle Willard-Kyle
Modern European, Jewish, Women's and Gender History
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Danielle received her B.A. in History and English from Westmont College, her M.A. in History in collaboration with Jewish Studies from the University of Toronto, and her M.St. in Jewish Studies from the University of Oxford. She is currently a second-year doctoral student working on Modern European and Women's and Gender Studies. In particular, her research focuses on post-Holocaust refugees, migration, and families in Western Europe.

 

 

 

 

Joseph Williams
African American History, Women’s and Gender
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Joseph entered the doctoral program at Rutgers after completing an M.A. in History at DePaul and a Master of Theological Studies (MTS) at Garrett Seminary.  He is interested in black intellectual history, women's and gender history, and American religious reform from the late nineteenth to the mid twentieth century.

 

 

 

 

 

Kyle Williams
American History
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Kyle received his Bachelor's from the University of Oklahoma in 2011, where he studied history and classical languages. His current interests lie in the 19th- and early 20th-century United States, broadly in intellectual and cultural history, Populism, and the history of capitalism.

 

 

 

 

 

altJennifer Wilson
Early Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Jennifer is a PhD Candidate studying early modern English religious politics and bodily epistemologies. Working under the supervision of Alastair Bellany, her dissertation entitled “Reading Ambiguous Bodies: Confessional Politics and Epistemological Anxiety in Early Modern England, c.1580-1660,” examines the ways that knowledge about the body shaped early modern confessional contests. She earned an M.A. from The New School for Social Research and is the recipient of the Bevier fellowship for 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

Sara Wisdom
Early Modern European History
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Brenna Yellin
Modern European History, Women’s and Gender
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Brenna is a first-year PhD student in European and Women's and Gender history. She attended UNC-Chapel Hill, where she received her B.A. in History. Brenna is interested in Modern German History, specifically in how women navigated the German Democratic Republic (GDR, or East Germany) and German Reunification. Brenna also hopes to integrate and utilize oral history in her work.

 

 

 

 

 

Jasmin Young
African-American History, American
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 Kevin Young
Latin American, Caribbean History, Global and Comparative
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Kevin is a fourth-year PhD candidate who completed qualifying examinations in Colonial and Modern Latin America and Global Comparative History in 2015. His dissertation concerns the enslavement of Native Americans from New Spain in Caribbean colonies from the Bourbon Reforms throughout the long nineteenth century. His committee includes Aldo Lauria-Santiago, Mark Wasserman, and Camilla Townsend.

 

 

 

 

 

altAmy Zanoni
American History, Women's and Gender, African-American
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Amy is a fifth-year doctoral candidate whose research examines social movements, welfare and health care policy, and political economy in the late twentieth-century United States. Her dissertation, “Poor Health: Retrenchment and Resistance in Chicago’s Public Hospital,” uses a single public hospital to illuminate the machinations of public sector retrenchment, its effects on marginalized populations, and the counter-movements it engendered in late twentieth-century Chicago. Amy holds a BA in Latin American & Caribbean Studies and English from McGill University and an MA in Historical Studies from the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She is currently a graduate fellow at the Rutgers University Center for Cultural Analysis.

 

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