Professors

Portrait (head shot photo)
Stephen Reinert
Associate Professor of History; and Director, Modern Greek Studies Program
Degree: Ph.D. in History (Byzantine, western medieval, medieval Balkans), UCLA (1982)
Additional Degree(s): M.A. in Near Eastern Languages & Cultures (Turcology), UCLA (1981) B.A. in History, Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington (1972)
Rutgers : At Rutgers since 1985
Specialty: Late Byzantine & Early Ottoman History
Email: sreinert@history.rutgers.edu
Office: 218 Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8234

 

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research focus is comparative Byzantine, Balkan, and Turkic history and culture in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. I am particularly interested in the figures Manuel II Palaiologos and Yildirim I Bayezid, and Christian perceptions of Islam and Muslims.

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

My current usual offerings are:

Undergraduate

  • 510:213 The Crusades
  • 510:255 Dracula: Facts & Fictions
  • Seminars (History, Honors) Medieval Cluny, Christendom & Islam

Graduate

  • 510:509 The Teaching of History
  • 510:541 Colloquium in Global History

PUBLICATIONS

My key articles on late Byzantine and early Ottoman history are published as Late Byzantine and Early Ottoman Studies (Ashgate, 2014). I am also the principal editor of TO ELLENIKON: Studies in Honor of Speros Vryonis, Jr., vol. 1, Hellenic Antiquity and Byzantium, and vol. 2, Byzantinoslavica, Islamica, the Balkans and Modern Greece (Caratzas, 1993). I am the coordinating translator and editor of the English edition of Matei Cazacu’s Dracula (Brill, 2017). I’m currently working on two books: Yildirim I Bayezid: An Early Ottoman Sultan, and Studies on Manuel II Palaiologos.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • Byzantine Studies Association of North America
  • Turkish Studies Association
  • Medieval Academy of America
Portrait (head shot photo)
Matt K. Matsuda
Professor of History; and Academic Dean, New Brunswick Honors College;
College Avenue Campus Dean
Degree: Ph.D., Department of History, UCLA (1993)
Rutgers : At Rutgers Since 1993
Specialty: Modern France; History of the Pacific
Email: matt.matsuda@rutgers.edu
Office: 5 Seminary Place
Phone: 848-932-0972

 

 

 

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Modern Europe, France, Nineteenth Century cultural and intellectual histories. Asia-Pacific and Pacific Islands global and comparative histories. Memory and historical consciousness, historiography, European empire and colonialism.

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

Undergraduate

  • Seminar: History and Memory
  • 510:102 Development of Europe II 1715-present
  • Europe in the Nineteenth Century
  • Modern European Intellectual History
  • History of Modern France, 1789-1996
  • Patterns in Civilization: Europe and Japan: Love
  • 506:203 Histories of the Pacific
  • Paris/Tokyo 1700-present
  • Asian American Immigration: Living Histories

Graduate

  • Graduate Colloquium: Constructing Modernity
  • Graduate Colloquium: Theorizing Modern France
  • Modern European Problems and Directed Readings
  • Modern European Research Seminar
  • Weekly Seminar of the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis
  • Focused for two years 1999-2001 on "Utopia, Violence, Resistance: Remaking and Unmaking Humanity. Participation of graduate fellows and sponsored undergraduates in research studies concerning history and human rights, ideal states, revolution, and redefinitions of the human.

PUBLICATIONS

Books

  • Pacific Worlds: A History of Seas, Peoples, and Cultures (Cambridge University Press, 2012, hardback and paperback issues)
  • Empire of Love: Histories of France and the Pacific (Oxford University Press, 2005, hardback and paperback issued)
  • The Memory of the Modern (Oxford University Press, 1996, pp. vi, 255, hardcover and paperback issued)

Selected Articles and Chapters 

  • “Of Queens and Kinship: Politics and Legacies in the Colonial Pacific,” in Jared Poley, ed., Kinship and Community (2012)
  • “Nostalgia in French History: Passions and Purposes,” special Issue of Historical Reflections/Réflections Historiques, edited by Patrick Hutton (2012)
  • Emotional Latitudes: Special Issue of Historical Reflections/Réflections Historiques, Vol. 34, no.1 (Spring 2008) Co-edited with Alice Bullard
  • “Speaking of China, Speaking of Europe Across Cultures” Taiwan Journal of East Asian Studies (Fall 2007)
  • “This Territory Was Not Empty: Pacific Possibilities” Geographical Review, Special Issue, Vol. 97, no.2 (April 2007)
  • “Ocean-Based Histories—The Pacific” American Historical Review, Vol. 111. no. 3 (June 2006)
  • “Does Empire Have Memory?” Ab Imperio Forum (Fall 2004)
  • “Representing Landscape: the Place of History,” History and Theory, May (2004)
  • “Idols of the Emperor” in Jeffrey Olick, ed.,  States of Memory (University of Michigan Press, 2003)
  • "East of No West: The Posthistorie of Postwar France and Japan" in Douglas Slaymaker, ed., Confluences: Postwar France and Japan (University of Michigan Press, Fall 2002)
  • "Empire of Love: Pierre Loti and Juliette Adam", Raritan, Spring/ Summer (2002)
  • "Idols of the Emperor" from The Memory of the Modern (forthcoming in Jeffrey Olick, ed., History and National Memory, 2002)
  • "Plays Without People" in Lynda Jessup, ed., Policing the Boundaries of Modernism and Antimodernism (Toronto University Press, 2001), pp. 192-205
  • "Geopolitics of Desire: The French in Panama" in Proceedings of the Western Society for French History, Vol. 27, (2001) pp. 272-280
  • "The Tears of Madame Chrysanthème," French Cultural Studies, (February 2000), pp. 31-51
  • "In the Revolutionary Garden: Recreating Savages and Civilization," Historical Reflections/Réflexions Historiques (Fall 1996), pp. 303-319
  • "Doctor, Judge, Vagabond: Identity, Identification, and Other Memories of the State," History and Memory,Vol. 6, no. 1. 1994, pp. 73-94
  • "The Body of the Philosopher: Memory, Mythology, and the Modern," Strategies, Vol. 4/5 1991, pp. 134-150

AWARDS

  • Community/ University Research Partnership Grant with Intersect Fund (2012)
  • International Service Learning Grant with GREEN (Renewable Energy NGO) (2012)
  • Bildner Intercultural Fellows Grant: “Dancing Histories: Intercultural History” with Jeffrey Friedman (2005-6)
  • Purpose Grant: “Performing History” with Jennifer Jones (2003-4)
  • Bildner Intercultural Fellows Grant: “Asian Oceans: Intercultural History” with Indrani  Chatterjee (2003-4)
  • Project Director, "Utopia, Violence Resistance: Remaking and Unmaking
  • Humanity—Global Visions/ Local Histories," project for Rutgers Centerfor Historical Analysis (2000-2001)
  • Rutgers Dialogues Grant: "Rethinking the Pacific Century: History and Globalization" (1999, 2000, 2001)
  • NEH Summer Institute: Re-imagining Indigenous Cultures: The Pacific Islands East-West Center, Honolulu (1999)
  • Rutgers Faculty of Arts and Sciences Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Teaching (1997)
  • Faculty Prize, UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award (1990)
  • Paris Program in Critical Theory (1990)

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • Society for French Historical Studies
  • Western Society for French History
  • New York Area French History Seminar
  • Editorial Board Historical Reflections/ Réflections Historiques
  • Phi Beta Kappa Society
  • AAUP
Portrait (head shot photo)
Norman Markowitz
Associate Professor of History
Degree: Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1970
Additional Degree(s): M.A., University of Michigan, 1967 B.A., CCNY, 1966
Rutgers : At Rutgers Since 1971
Specialty: Modern US: Political History
Email: markowit@history.rutgers.edu
Office: 007B Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8536

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My work is in twentieth century U.S. political history. I write and teach from a Marxist perspective, and I have written in recent years many articles for the History News Service, the History News Network, the journal Political Affairs and various Encylopedias, including the Encyclopedia of American National Biography, and the Encyclopedia of Social Movements on a variety of topics, including biographical entries on Jimmy Hoffa, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, the Civil Rights movement, 1930-1953, and Poor Peoples Movements in American History.

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

  • 506:361 History of Socialism and Communism
  • 506:363 History of Imperialism
  • 512:305 United States History, 1914-1945
  • 512:306 United States History, 1945-present
  • 512:316 History of Radicalism in America
  • 512:376 American Culture in the 1950s
  • 512:377 American Culture in the 1960s
Portrait (head shot photo)
James Masschaele
Professor of History; and Executive Vice Dean, School of Arts and Sciences
Degree: Ph.D., University of Toronto
Additional Degree(s): B.A., University of Western Ontario
Rutgers : At Rutgers Since 1991
Specialty: Medieval Britain: Socio-Economic and Legal History
Website: http://www.rci.rutgers.edu/~massch
Email: >massch@rhistory.rutgers.edu
Office: 216 Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8229

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My general area of research interest is the social, economic, and legal history of medieval England. I am interested in the history of markets and trade, the nature of peasant society, and relations between central government and local communities.  Currently, I am working on a book that explores the history and memory of peasant revolts in England in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

Undergraduate

  • 510:209 Emergence of Medieval Europe
  • 510:211 Harvest of the Middle Ages
  • 510:338 England in the Middle Ages
  • 510:441 Seminar: Social History of Medieval England
  • 510:329 Medieval Culture

Graduate

  • 510:593 Problems and Directed Readings in Medieval History

PUBLICATIONS

  • Jury, State, and Society in Medieval England (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008).
  • Peasants, Merchants, and Markets: Inland Trade in Medieval England, c.1150-c.1350 (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1997).
  • “The English Economy in the Era of Magna Carta,” in Janet Loengard, ed., Magna Carta and the World of King John (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell and Brewer, forthcoming 2010).
  • “Town, Country, and Law: Royal Courts and Regional Mobility in Medieval England, c.1200-c.1400,” in Richard Goddard, John Langdon, and Miriam Müller, eds., Survival and Discord in Medieval Society: Essays in Honour of Christopher Dyer (Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Press, forthcoming 2010), pp. 129-46.
  • "Economic Takeoff and the Rise of Markets," in Carol Lansing and Edward D. English, eds., A Companion to the Medieval World (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell Publishers, 2009), pp. 89-110.

AWARDS

  • 2004 Faculty of Arts and Sciences Teaching Award.
  • 1997-1998 Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Scholarly Excellence.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • AHA
  • Medieval Academy of America
  • Pipe Roll Society
  • Selden Society
  • North American British Studies Association
Portrait (head shot photo)
James Livingston
Professor of History
Degree: Ph.D., Northern Illinois, 1980
Specialty: Modern US: Intellectual and Economic History
Email: jameslivingston49@hotmail.com
Office: 307 Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8375

RESEARCH INTERESTS

I started out as an economic historian writing about banking reform in the Progressive Era.  My first book, which is still in print thanks to the financial crises created by supply-side economics since 1983, was Origins of the Federal Reserve System: Money, Class, and Corporate Capitalism, 1890-1913 (Cornell U Press, 1986).  The success of post-structuralist theory and the return of pragmatism had meanwhile let me make my own “linguistic turn” toward cultural-intellectual history.  The result was Pragmatism and the Political Economy of Cultural Revolution, 1850-1940 (UNC Press, 1994).

Before and between these books, I was writing for Socialist Revolution, In These Times, democracy, Marxist Perspectives, and Cineaste on critical realignments, fiscal politics, disco, Keynes, Freud, Shakespeare, corporate liberalism, diplomatic history, and Disney, pretty much in that order.  Scholarly publications meanwhile appeared in Chicago History, The American Historical Review, Psycho-History Review, and Social Text.

Thereafter my abiding interest in pragmatism, consumer culture, and the rise of corporate capitalism led me toward a close study of modern feminism, particularly as it had emerged and evolved in the 20th-century US.  The result was Pragmatism, Feminism, and Democracy: Rethinking the Politics of American History (Routledge, 2001).

The “election” of George W. Bush and the political, intellectual, and cultural consequences of 9/11 changed my attitude toward history.  I started a blog in 2003 as a desperate, feeble protest against the militarization of American life and the march toward a “war on terror” in the Middle East.  It has since evolved into a writing experiment, a place where I try out different voices and perspectives, but always with an eye on the past.

Among other things, the blog has taught me how to write for an audience broader—and deeper—than my fellow academics.  At any rate the conversational, transactional style I learned there informed The World Turned Inside Out: American Thought and Culture at the End of the 20th Century (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009).  This book is in most respects a product of teaching undergraduate classes on cultural history in which music, movies, and cartoon politics are the principal subjects.

When the Great Recession hit, I was swamped with demands to explain it, mostly from perfect strangers who had read the Fed book.  Here’s a financial crisis, they said, what’s the story?  So in October 2008, I wrote up a two-part comparison of the Great Depression and the current debacle, posted it at the blog, and offered it to History News Network.  It went viral within a week.  That’s how Against Thrift: Why Consumer Culture is Good for the Economy, the Environment, and Your Soul (Basic Books, 2011), and op-eds for WiredThe New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and The Christian Science Monitor, got written.

My current interests center on the intellectual revolution in the pilot disciplines of the postwar university, particularly in History departments—I’m 20,000 words into a book on the topic—and on the fetish of work in every current incarnation of critical theory, from Marxism to psychoanalysis.  The latter interest has given me a tentative title for another book.  F@!% WORK, I call it, with an endless subtitle that would just start as follows: Why “Full Employment’ is a Bad Idea, or, When Work Disappears, What Is To Be Done?

Photo Credit: Bruce Williams Photography

PUBLICATIONS