Professors

Portrait (head shot photo)
Belinda Davis
Professor of History; and Director of the Rutgers Center for European Studies
Degree: Ph.D., University of Michigan
Additional Degree(s): B.A., Wesleyan University
Rutgers : At Rutgers Since 1992
Specialty: Modern Germany: Popular Politics; Women's and Gender History
Email: bedavis@rutgers.edu
Office: 107 Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8342

CLICK pdf here (100 KB) for Curriculum Vitae.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Belinda Davis is author or co-editor of four books and several dozen articles, on themes including popular politics; conceptions of democracy and of how change takes place; gender; history of everyday life; oral history, memory, and emotion; urban history; transnational history; policing, violence, and terror; and consumption. Her graduate students have completed or are completing dissertations on topics ranging from Turkish “guestworkers” in West Germany, to identities in German-Polish and German-Czech borderlands, to sexualities in twentieth-century Germany and Hungary, to Holocaust survivors’ memory and resettlement, to “lived ideologies” (antifascism, socialism) in the postwar Germanies and Europe. Her book The Internal Life of Politics: Extraparliamentary Opposition in West Germany, 1962-1983 is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press.

FORMER AND CURRENT GRADUATE STUDENTS

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

Undergraduate

  • 510:102 Europe in the Global Age
  • 506:299 History Workshop
  • 510:327 20th-Century Europe
  • 510:363 History of Germany From 1871 to the Present
  • 510:401/360:401 Idea of Europe

Graduate

  • 510:539 Colloquium in Gender, Politics, and Everyday Life
  • 510:549/550 Research Seminar in Women's & Gender History
  • 510:567 Colloquium in German and European History
  • 510:599 Readings in Modern Europe
  • 510:615/616 Research Seminar in European History

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Books

  • The Internal Life of Politics: ‘Extraparliamentary’ Politics in West Germany, 1962-1983 (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, forthcoming)
  • Changing the World, Changing Oneself: Political Protest and Collective Identities in the 1960s/70s West Germany and U.S., ed., with W. Mausbach, M. Klimke, and C. MacDougall (New York/Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2010, 2012)
  • Alltag—Erfahrung—Eigensinn: Historisch-anthropologische Erkundungen, ed., with Thomas Lindenberger and Michael Wildt (Frankfurt a.M./New York: Campus, 2008)
  • Home Fires Burning: Food, Politics, and Everyday Life in World War I Berlin (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000).

Selected Recent Articles and Book Chapters

  • "Democratic Processes, Revolutions, and Civil Resistance,” in Eugenio Biagini and Gary Gerstle, eds., The Cultural History of Democracy (NY: Bloomsbury Press; ms. in preparation)
  • “Enttäuschung und die Emotionen des Gesetzes der Geschichte und der historische Verwandlung,” in Andreas Wirsching and Bernhard Gotto, eds., Hoffnung – Scheitern – Weiterleben (Munich forthcoming)
  • “Redefining the Political: The Gender of Activism in Grassroots Movements of the 1960s-1980s,” in Donna Harsch, et al, eds., Gendering Post-1945 German History: Entanglements (NY: Berghahn, forthcoming)
  • “’Going All the Way’ for the People? Traugott v. Jagow’s Changes in Thought and Action Concerning Governance in World War I Germany,” in Tomasz Pudlocki and Kamil Ruszała, eds., “Intellectuals and the First World War: a Central European Perspective,” (Krakow: Jagellionian University Press, 2018)
  • “Europe is a Peaceful Woman, America is a War-Mongering Man? The 1980s Peace Movement in NATO-Allied Europe,” in Maria Bühner and Maren Möhring, eds., Europäische Geschlechtergeschichte in Quellen und Essays (Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 2018), reprinted and slightly revised from Europa ist eine Frau, Themenportal Europäische Geschichte
  • “A Brief Cosmogeny of the Green Party,” in “Creating Participatory Democracy: Green Politics in Germany since 1983,” Special issue of German Politics and Society (Winter 2015), 53-65.
  • “Curriculum as Disobedience: Raising Children to Transform Adults,” in Journal of Curriculum Theorizing 29, 1 (April 2013), 134-73
  • “Political Participation and Gender: Lessons from the Cold War,” in Joanna Regulska and Bonnie Smith, eds., Women and Gender in Postwar Europe: From Cold War to European Union (NY: Routledge, 2012), 139-55.
  • “Polizei – und Gewalt auf der Straße. Konfliktmuster und ihre Folgen im Berlin des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts,” in Alf Lüdtke, et al, eds., Polizei, Gewalt und Staat im 20. Jahrhundert (Wiesbaden: Springer Vs Verlag, 2011), 81-104
  • “A Whole World Opening Up:  Transcultural Contact, Difference, and the Politicization of ‘New Left’ Activists,” in Davis, et al, eds., Changing the World, Changing Oneself  (New York: Berghahn, 2010), 255-73
  • “Introduction,” with W. Mausbach, M. Klimke, C. MacDougall, in ibid, vii-xix
  • “Transnation und Transkultur. Gender und Politisierung von den fünziger bis in die siebziger Jahre,” in Detlef Siegfried and Sven Reichardt, eds., Das Alternative Milieu. Antibürgerlicher Lebensstil und linke Politik in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und Europa 1968-1983 (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2010), 313-34
  • “Konsum im ersten Weltkriege,” in Heinz-Gerhard Haupt and Claudius Torp, eds., Die Konsumgesellschaft in Deutschland 1890-1990 (Frankfurt: Campus, 2009), 232-49
  • “What’s Left?  Popular and Democratic Political Participation in Postwar Europe,” American Historical Review 113, 2 (April 2008), 363-90
  • “Einleitung,” with T. Lindenberger and M. Wildt, in Davis, Lindenberger, Wildt, eds., Eigen-Sinn, Alltag, und Erfahrung (Frankfurt/aM: Campus, 2008), 11-28
  • “The City as Theater of Protest: West Berlin and West Germany, 1962-1983,” in Gyan Prakash and Kevin M. Kruse, eds., The Spaces of the Modern City: Imaginaries, Politics, and Everyday Life (Princeton: Princeton UP, 2008), 247-74
  • “Civil Society in a New Key? Feminist and Alternative Groups in 1970s West Germany,” in Sonya Michel, et al, eds., Civil Society and Gender Justice: Historical and Comparative Perspectives (NY: Berghahn, 2008), 208-23

SELECTED PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY

  • Co-Organizer, Conference “Social Movements After 1968,” Center for European Studies, Rutgers University, November 2018; follow-up workshop at International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam, 2019
  • Advisory Board, Center for Metropolitan Studies, Technische Universität Berlin, 2009-
  • Editorial Board, American Historical Review, 2013-2016
  • Associate Editor, Signs, 2005-2013
  • North American Editor, Women’s History Review, 2004-2007
  • Co-Investigator, Project “Das Fremde im Eigenen: Interkultureller Austausch und kollektive Identitäten in der Revolte der 1960er Jahre," Volkswagen Stiftung, 2002-2005

SELECTED AWARDS

  • European University Institute (Florence), Fernand Braudel Senior Fellowship, Spring 2015
  • Zentrum für Zeithistorische Forschung (Potsdam), Residential Fellowship, Summer 2006
  • Volkswagen Research Fellowship, AY 2005-6
  • Shelby Cullom Davis Center, Princeton University, Research Fellowship, 2003-2004
Portrait (head shot photo)
Barbara M. Cooper
Professor of History
Degree: Ph.D., Boston University; B.A., St. John’s College (Annapolis)
Rutgers : At Rutgers Since 2001
Specialty: History of West Africa; History of Religion; Women's and Gender History; History of Health
Email: bacooper@history.rutgers.edu
Office: 003 Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8525

Mailing address:
Department of History
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
16 Seminary Place
New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1108

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

Undergraduate

  • 01:506:226 Contemporary Challenges in International Health
  • 01:506:401 History Seminar: Exploring the History of Emotions
  • 01:508:220 Ancient Africa
  • 01:508:222 Modern Africa
  • 01:508:224 Women and Gender in African History
  • 01:508:226 War and Violence in Africa
  • 01:508:326 Islam in African History
  • 01:508:328 History of Health and Healing in Africa

Graduate

  • 16:510:503 Africa in World History
  • 16:510:539 Colloquium in Women's & Gender History
  • 16:510:560 Readings in Women, Gender and Sexuality

PUBLICATIONS

  • Countless Blessings: A History of Childbirth and Reproduction in the Sahel (Indiana University Press, forthcoming Spring 2019)
  • Transforming Africa's Religious Landscapes: The Sudan Interior Mission (SIM), Past and Present Co-edited by Barbara Cooper, Gary Corwin, Tibebe Eshete, Musa Gaiya, Tim Geysbeek, & Shobana Shankar (Red Sea Press forthcoming Fall 2018)
  • La honte au Sahel. Co-edited with Catherine Baroin (Sepia, 2018)
  • Evangelical Christians in the Muslim Sahel. (Indiana University Press, 2006)
  • Marriage in Maradi: Gender and Culture in a Hausa Society in Niger, 1900-1989. Portsmouth: Heinemann (Social History of Africa Series, 1997)

Articles and Book Chapters

  • “Representing Adolescent Sexuality in the Sahel,” in Writing through the Visual and Virtual: Inscribing Language, Literature, and Culture in Francophone Africa and the Caribbean edited by Renee Larrier and Ousseina Alidou, London: Lexington Books, 2015, 113-122.
  • “American Missions in Wartime French West Africa: Travails of the Sudan Interior Mission in Niger,” in Africa and World War II, Carolyn Brown, Judith Byfield, Timothy Parsons and Ahmad Sikainga (eds.). Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2015, 359-382.
  • “De quoi la crise démographique au Sahel est-elle le nom?” In Crises et chuchotements au Sahel Vincent Bonnecase and Julien Brachet (eds.), Politique africaine #130, June 2013.
  • “Women and Gender,” in Oxford Handbook of Modern African History, John Parker and Richard Reid (eds.). Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013, 338-58.
  • “The Implications of Reproductive Politics for Religious Competition in Niger,” in Christianity and Public Culture in Africa, Harri Englund (ed.). Athens: Ohio University Press, 2011. 89-108.
  • “Kindred Concerns: the Vernacular and Contemporary Media in Africa,” Journal of Women’s History, 22 (3) 2010, 190-94.
  • “Engendering a Hausa Vernacular Christian Practice,” in Being and Becoming Hausa: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Anne Haour and Benedetta Rossi (eds.). Leiden: Brill, 2010. 257-77.
  • “Injudicious Intrusions: Chiefly Authority and Islamic Judicial Practice in Maradi, Niger,” in Muslim Family Law in Colonial and Postcolonial Africa, Richard Roberts and Shamil Jeppie and Ebrahim Moosa (eds.). Amsterdam University Press, 2010, 183-218.
  • “Secular States, Muslim Law and Islamic Religious Culture: Gender Implications of Legal Struggles in Hybrid Legal Systems in Contemporary West Africa, » Droit et Cultures, 01 July 2010, Issue 59: 97-120
  • “Chronic nutritional crisis and the trope of the bad mother,” in Jean-Herve Jezequel and Xavier Crombe eds., A Not-So Natural Disaster: Niger 2005 (Columbia University Press 2009)
  • "La rhétorique de la ‘mauvaise mère’," in Xavier Crombé and Jean-Hervé Jézéquel (eds.), Niger 2005 Une catastrophe si naturelle, Karthala, 2007, 199-226.
  • “Oral Sources and the Challenge of African History,” in Writing African History, John Philips (ed.), University of Rochester Press, 2005, 191-215.
  • “Anatomy of a Riot: The Social Imaginary, Single Women, and Religious Violence in Niger,” Canadian Journal of African Studies / Revue Canadienne des Études Africaines, Vol. 37, No. 2/3 (2003), pp. 467-512
  • “The Strength in the Song: Muslim Personhood, Audible Capital and Hausa Women’s Performance of the Hajj,” Social Text, (60) 1999: 87-109.
    Rpt. in Gendered Modernities: Ethnographic Perspectives, edited by Dorothy Hodgson, Palgrave, 2001, 79-104.
    Rpt. In The Anthropology of Islam Reader edited by Jens Kreinath. Routledge, 2011, 198-214.
  • “Gender, Movement, and History: Social and Spatial Transformations in 20th Century Maradi, Niger,”  Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 15, 1997:195-221.
    Rpt in French as “Le genre sexuel, le mouvement et l’histoire: transformations sociales et spatiales au XXP siècle Maradi au Niger,” translated by Denise Ganderton and reprinted in Géographies Anglo-Saxonnes: Tendances contemporaines, edited by Jean-François Staszak et al, Belin, 2001, 80-94.
  • “The politics of difference and women's associations in Niger: of ‘prostitutes,’ the public, and politics,” Signs, Jul 1995, Vol. 20 (4): 851-882
    Rpt. in “Wicked” Women and the Reconfiguration of Gender in Africa, edited by Sheryl McCurdy and Dorothy Hodgson, Heinemann, 2001, 255-273.
  •  “Women's Worth and Wedding Gift Exchange in Maradi, Niger, 1907-89,” The Journal of African History, Vol. 36, No. 1 (1995): 121-140
  • “Reflections on Slavery, Seclusion and Female Labor in the Maradi Region of Niger in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries,” The Journal of African History, Vol. 35, No. 1 (1994): 61-78
  • “Cloth, Commodity Production, and Social Capital: Women in Maradi, Niger 1890-1989,” African Economic History, No. 21 (1993): 51-71

Co-Authored Articles

  • Barbara Cooper, Gary Corwin, Tibebe Eshete, Musa Gaiya, Tim Geysbeek and Shobana Shankar, “Introduction,” in Transforming Africa’s Religious Landscapes: The Sudan Interior Mission (SIM), Past and Present edited by Barbara Cooper, Gary Corwin, Tibebe Eshete, Musa Gaiya, Tim Geysbeek and Shobana Shankar, Trenton: Africa World Press, 2018, 287-312.
  • Catherine Baroin and Barbara Cooper, “La honte, introduction au dossier,” in La Honte au Sahel edited by Catherine Baroin and Barbara Cooper, Paris: Sépia, 2018, 9-20.
  • Julie Livingston, Keith Wailoo, and Barbara M. Cooper, “Vaccination as Governance: HPV Skepticism in the United States and Africa, and the North-South Divide” in Keith Wailoo, Julie Livingston, Steven Epstein, and Robert Aronowitz, Three Shots at Prevention: The HPV Vaccine and the Politics of Medicine’s Simple Solutions (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010) 231-53

AWARDS

  • Melville J. Herskovits Prize of the African Studies Association for the best book published in 2006 (Evangelical Christians in the Muslim Sahel)
  • Finalist for the Melvin J. Herskovits Award of the African Studies Association for the best book published in 1997 (Marriage in Maradi: Gender and Culture in a Hausa Society in Niger, 1900-1989)
  • Nominated by the Journal of African History for the 1995 Berkshire Conference on Women annual article prize for “Women’s worth and wedding gift exchange in Maradi, Niger, 1907-1989.”

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • American Historical Association
  • African Studies Association
  • West Africa Research Association
Portrait (head shot photo)
Paul G.E. Clemens
Professor of History
Degree: Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
Additional Degree(s): B.A. (mathematics), University of Maryland
Rutgers : At Rutgers Since 1974
Specialty: Early America: Socio-Economic and Legal History
Website: http://fas-history.rutgers.edu/~clemens/
Email: clemens@history.rutgers.edu
Office: 217B Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8232
Research Interests: Mid-Atlantic from 1760 to 1820, "consumer revolution" of the late eighteenth century, History of Rutgers University, from 1966 to the present, Aspects of the Leopold-Loeb 1924 kidnapping and murder case.

I am completing a book on rural cultural, political economy and the market in the Mid-Atlantic from 1760 to 1820, and have recently published on the "consumer revolution" of the late eighteenth century. I am also working on the history of Rutgers University, from 1966 to the present, as part of an oral history collaboration with Sandra Holyoak, and in hopes of updating by 2016 the 1966 bicentennial history of Rutgers.  Kathleen Jones of Virginia Tech and I plan to complete two or more articles on various aspects of the Leopold-Loeb 1924 kidnapping and murder case.

COURSES TAUGHT

Undergraduate

  • 512:103: Development of the United States to 1877
  • 512:104: Development of the United States from 1877
  • 512:301: The American Revolution
  • 512:315: Famous Trials: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights in Modern America
  • 512:402: Constitutional History to 1877
  • 512:404: Constitutional History from 1877

Graduate

  • American PDR I: Early America: North American During the Age of European Expansion
  • American PDR II: Early America: America in the Age of Revolution

PUBLICATIONS

  • 1995: Land Use in Early New Jersey (with Peter Wacker)
  • 1993: The Uses of Abundance: A History of New Jersey's Economy
  • 1980: The Atlantic Economy and Colonial Maryland’s Eastern Shore

AWARDS

  • 1981 Albert J. Beveridge Award of the American Historical Society for the best book on the history of the United States, Canada, or Latin America.
  • 1982 Lindback Award for Excellence in Teaching
  • 1986 National Endowment for the Humanities Grant
  • 1986 Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Fellowship
  • 2004 Faculty of Arts and Sciences Award for Distinguished Teaching (Tenured Professors)
  • 2007 Rutgers University Warren I. Susman Award for Excellence in Teaching, Rutgers University

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • McNeil Center for Early American Studies
  • Omohundro Institute for the Study of Early American History and Culture
  • American Historical Association
  • Organization of American Historians
Portrait (head shot photo)
Carolyn Brown
Professor of History
Degree: Ph.D., 1985 Department of History, Columbia University
Additional Degree(s):
  • M. Phil., 1983 Department of History, Columbia University
  • M.I.A., 1969 School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University
  • B.A., 1966 Hiram College, Hiram, Ohio
Specialty: Twentieth-Century West Africa: Labor History
Website: http://ruafrica.rutgers.edu
Email: cbrown@panix.com
Office: 110 Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8569

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My primary research interests are in West African labor and social history with current emphasis on masculinity, nationalism, African involvement in World War II and slavery in Southeastern Nigeria.  I have several book projects. In 2015 Cambridge University Press published a co-edited book, Africa and World War II, which I edited with Judith Byfield (Cornell), Timothy Parsons (Washington U.) and Ahmad Sikainga (Ohio U.) This evolved from a series of conferences at Rutgers (2008) and Cornell University (2009) and three panels at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association.  The book is a unique collection of articles by leading Africanist scholars documenting the rarely acknowledged role played by African countries and soldiers in the war. It is designed to address the omission of Africa from the major narratives of World War II and is appropriate for advanced undergraduates and graduate students of Global, African and World War II history. The summer of 2016 Dr. Byfield and I were invited to launch the book at the University of Johannesburg, South Africa and the Free State University, Bloemfontein, South Africa. A second project, a social history of the nationalist movement in a particularly militant town, Enugu, Nigeria ('Red' Enugu is a series of essays that tell the history of the city through the experiences of several social groups who give Enugu its cultural and politically contested nature. Tentatively entitled, “Cowboys’, Letter Writers and Dancing Women: Identity and Nationalist Struggle in a West African City: Enugu, Nigeria 1914-1955”, it traces how race, class and gender identities shape and are shaped by the colonial city and how these identities influence the 'popular classes' response to nationalist discourse. One focus is to document how African men experiment with forms of masculinity in their position as clerical workers,  young unmarried men in a youth gang called the 'Cowboys', African business men, urban coal miners and professional letter writers (called 'bush lawyers').  I am also interested in the slave trade in southeastern Nigeria, a very small area but which was the major source area of slaves in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The project, 'Memories of Sorrow and Loss, - the Slave Trade and Southeastern Nigeria’, is an oral history of how the trade is remembered by communities in southeastern Nigeria. The first phase produced one volume, coedited with Paul Lovejoy, Repercussions of the Atlantic Slave Trade: The Interior of the Bight of Biafra and the African Diaspora (Africa World Press, 2011) which included papers from a major slavery conference in Nike Lake Nigeria, sponsored by Rutgers, the Ford Foundation Harriet Tubman Center for Research on Africa and its Diasporas York University, Canada, the African Research Center, Enugu and the Schomburg Center of NYPL.

A final project links African and African-American history. ‘Global Timbuktu: Meanings and Narratives of Resistance in Africa and the Americas’ is a multi-faced project focused on two antebellum villages named after the Malian city of Islamic learning, Timbuktu. One, Timbuctoo, in Westampton Township, New Jersey, was founded in 1825 as a free black community that was very involved in the Underground Railroad. The other Timbuctoo, near North Elba, New York, was established by an abolitionist to give free Black men land to fulfill the financial requirement for the vote in New York State. It also became important as the site where John Brown, the militant abolitionist, settled, taught farming and is buried. The Center for African Studies, with support from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, the Dean’s Office of Arts and Sciences Rutgers University, and the Amistad Project of the NJ Board of Education, has held a teacher’s workshop, and will hold an international conference of scholars from Mali, South Africa and the U. S. on the convergence of these various settlements. Additionally we will organize two SKYPE conversations between NJ students and students in Timbuktu, Mali. It concludes with a site visit and community presentation at the site of Westampton Township.

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

  • Undergraduate Courses: Ancient Africa; West Africa; Southern Africa; African Labor History; Imperialism; World War II and Africa, Nationalism in Africa,
  • Undergraduate Historical Studies: African Urban History; Violence in Africa;
  • Undergraduate Seminars: African Urban Social History; Africa in World War II; Gender, Race and Class in African History; African Nationalism
  • Graduate Courses: Colloquium in African Labor History; Graduate Colloquium in African History; Protest and Consciousness: African Labor History in Comparative Perspective

PUBLICATIONS

  • "Locals and Migrants in the Coal Mining Town of Enugu (Nigeria): Worker Protest and Urban Identity, 1914-1929", International Review of Social History, Volume 60, Special Issue S1 (Migration and Ethnicity in Coalfield History: Global Perspectives) December 2015, 63-94.
  • Co-Editor with Judith Byfield, Ahmad Sikainga and Timothy Parsons, Africa and World War II, Cambridge University Press, April 2015.
  • “Senior Editors’ Note, “ (with Jennifer Klein and Peter Winn)  40th Anniversary Issue International Labor and Working Class History 82 (Fall 2012)
  • “Senior Editors’ Note, “ (with Jennifer Klein and Peter Winn)  Labor and Global Commodities  International Labor and Working Class History 81 ( Spring 2012)
  • “Senior Editors’ Note, “ (with Jennifer Klein and Peter Winn) Labor and the Military,  International Labor and Working Class History 80 (Fall 2011)
  • “Senior Editors’ Note, “ (with Jennifer Klein and Peter Winn) Labor Migration in the Middle East’, International Labor and Working Class History, 79 (Spring 2011)
  • “ Contestation and Identity Transformation under Colonialism: Emancipation Struggles in South Nkanu, 1920-1935”, C. Brown and P. Lovejoy, (eds) Repercussions of the Atlantic Slave Trade: The Interior of the Bight of Biafra and the African Diaspora, Trenton, N.J.: Africa World Press, 2011
  • Repercussions of the Atlantic Slave Trade: The Interior of the Bight of Biafra and the African Diaspora, C. Brown and P. Lovejoy, eds.,  African World Press (2011)
  • “Guest Editor’s Introduction,” (with Marcel van der Linden), Shifting Boundaries Between Free and Unfree Labor, International Labor and Working Class History, No. l. 78 Fall 2010.  
  • “The Iva Valley Shooting at Enugu Colliery, Nigeria: African Workers’ Aspirations and the Failure of Colonial Labor Reform”, Toyin Falola and Salah Hassan, eds., Power and Nationalism in Modern Africa: Essays in Honor of Don Ohadike, Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2008 
  • “Race and the Construction of Working-Class Masculinity in the Nigerian Coal Industry: The Initial Phase, 1914-1930”, International Labor and Working Class History, Vol 69, No. 1 (March 2006) 35-56. 
  • “The Iva Valley Mining Community: Nigerian Coal Miners, Protest and Gender, 1914-1949”. S. Berger and A. Croll, (eds.), Towards a Comparative of Coal Mining Societies. London: Ashgate Press (2004)
  • “A ‘Man’ in the Village is a ‘Boy’ in the Workplace: Colonial Racism, Worker Militance and Igbo Notions of Masculinity in the Nigerian Coal Industry, 1930-1945”, L. Lindsay and S. Miescher (eds.), Men and Masculinities in Modern Africa. Portsmouth, N.H. Heinemann (2003)
  • “‘Memories of Pain and Sorrow’: The Oral History Project on Memory and the Slave Trade in Southeastern Nigeria”, S. Diouf, ‘Fighting Back’: African Strategies Against the Slave Trade. Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press. (2003)
  • “We Are All Slaves”: African Miners, Culture, and Resistance at the Enugu Government Colliery, Nigeria, 1914-1950. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann (2003)
  • “Becoming ‘Men’, Becoming ‘Workers’: Race, Gender and Workplace Struggle in the Nigerian Coal Industry, 1937-49”, P. Alexander and R. Halpern, (eds.) Racializing Class, Classifying Race: Labour and Difference in Britain, the USA and Africa, London: MacMillan Press, 2000
  • “Testing the Boundaries of Marginality: Twentieth-Century Slavery and Emancipation Struggles in Nkanu, Northern Igboland 1920-29,” Journal of African History (1996) 37.
  • “Struggles Over the Labor Process: Enugu Government Colliery, Nigeria, during World War II,” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East (1996) 15
  • “The Dialectics of Colonial Labour Control: Class Struggles in the Nigerian Coal Industry, 1914-1949,” Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 33 1-2, (1988) 32-59.
  • This article was reprinted in, Third World Workers:Comparative International Labour Studies, ed. by P.C.W. Gutkind (E.J.Brill Press, Leiden, 1988), 32-59.
  • “Apartheid and Trilaterism: Partners in Southern Africa,” in Holly Sklar, ed., The Trilateral Commission: Elite Planning for World Management. South End Press, 1980.

AWARDS

  • 2010-  2012   Schomburg – Associate Fellow in Residence
  • 2009-10 Schomburg-NEH Scholars-in-Residence Grant. 
  • 2008    Fulbright Distinguished Chair’s Grant, York University, Canada
  • 2006    Rockefeller Resident Fellowship, Humanities Program, Northwestern  U.
  • 2003 Book of the Year Prize, International Labor History Association for We Are All Slaves: African Miners, Culture, and Resistance at the Enugu Government Colliery, Nigeria, 1914-1950. Heinemann (2003)
  • 1998-99, Fellow, American Philosophical Society [fieldwork in Nigeria]
  • 1998-99, National Endowment of the Humanities Fellow, Schomburg Center, N.Y. Public Library
  • 1989-91, Presidential Postdoctoral Fellowship, Univ. of California, Berkeley,
  • 1986-87, Postdoctoral Fellow, Joint Committee on Africa, American Council of Learned Societies and Social Science Research Council. Fieldwork in Nigeria and England

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

  • Senior Editor, International Labor and Working Class History, Cambridge 2010-
  • European Social Science History Association, Network co-chair ‘Labor’, 2004-2006
  • Advisory Board, Nigerian Hinterland Project/Harriet Tubman Center for the Black Diaspora, York University, Canada. 2001-
  • Editorial Board, African Series, Cambridge University Press, 2000-
  • Editorial Advisory Board, Journal of African History, 2001-2004
  • African Studies Association. Board of Directors. Policy Planning and Decision Making Body for Association. Board Member, 1993-1996.
Portrait (head shot photo)
Rudolph M. Bell
Distinguished Professor of History
Degree: Ph.D., City University of New York, 1969, B.A., Queens College, 1963
Rutgers : Joined Rutgers in July, 1968
Specialty: Medieval and Early Modern Europe: History of Religion and Gender
Email: rbell@history.rutgers.edu
Office: 100 Van Dyck Hall
Phone: 848-932-8539
Research Interests: I work in all aspects of Italian history but with particular attention to religion, gender, popular culture, mysticism, and the history of the book.

COURSES REGULARLY TAUGHT

Undergraduate

  • 506:112 Patterns in Civilization: Love (with Prof. Roden)
  • 506:113 Patterns in Civilization: Death (with Prof. Roden)
  • 506:151 History and the News
  • 510:354 History of Italy's Peoples
  • Seminars and Honors Seminars on Death, on Early Modern English Advice Manuals, and currently on children

Graduate

  • 510:509 The Teaching of History
  • Occasional seminars and colloquia

PUBLICATIONS

  • The Voices of Gemma Galgani: The Life and Afterlife of a Modern Saint, with Cristina Mazzoni (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003)
  • How to Do It: Guides to Good Living for Renaissance Italians (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999)
  • Holy Anorexia (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985)

AWARDS

  • National Gallery, London, Guest Lecturer, 2002
  • Rutgers University Board of Trustees Award for Outstanding Research, 1987
  • Fulbright-Hays, 1971-72

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE

  • Rutgers Junior Year Abroad Director in Italy, England, and Ireland
  • Director, Medieval and Early Modern Data Bank (website at RUL's SCC)
  • Former History Dept. Chair, 1988-1994
  • University Senator and Officer of New Brunswick Faculty Council
  • AHA member and former office-holder
  • Rutgers Council of American Association of University Professors, President

More Articles ...

  1. Bellany, Alastair