People

Tyesha Maddox
Race & Gender Postdoctoral Fellow and Lecturer
Email: tmaddox1@fordham.edu
Office: Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, 15 Seminary Place
Phone: 848-932-8701

Tyesha Maddox is an Assistant Professor at Fordham University in the Department of African and African American Studies.  She received her PhD in History from New York University in 2016.  She received a BA in History and Africana Studies and a MPS in Africana Studies both from Cornell University. 

Her current manuscript, "From Invisible to Immigrants: Political Activism and the Construction of Caribbean American Identity, 1890-1940," examines the significance of early twentieth century Anglophone Caribbean immigrant mutual aid societies and benevolent associations in New York.  It explored how immigrant social organizations played a vital role in the formation of transnational identities and facilitated in community building, arguing that participation in these organizations created kinship networks that both empowered immigrants to form a collective “Caribbean” identity and unleashed a political activism among immigrants fighting alongside African Americans to insure their equality in the tumultuous era of American Jim Crow.

Her most recent article “More than Auxiliary: Caribbean Women and Social Organizations in the Interwar Period,” was published in the Caribbean Review of Gender Studies’ Issue 12, Gender and Anti-Colonialism in the Interwar Caribbean, in December 2018.

Before joining the faculty at Fordham University, she was the 2015-2016 African and African Diaspora Studies Dissertation Fellow at Boston College and a 2015-2016 Kate B. & Hall J. Peterson Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society.  In 2018, she was a Scholar in Residence at the Schomburg Research Library in NYC as a Ford Foundation/Mellon Foundation Fellow.

Her research and teaching interests include the African Diaspora, Caribbean, Black Atlantic, Women and Gender, African American History, Race, Transnational Communities, Migrational Movements, Immigration, Black Identity Formation, Social and Cultural History.